(return to main page)
Mianus River Morris Song Page

                            This is a BIG page. You can get to the main parts here:
                            List of lyrics and those songs I've recorded at Ales.
                            Recordings of singing at various ales.
                            Recordings of 12th Night performances (with some singing):
                            1983, 1986, 1987, 1988 (song samples from records only)

                            All of this is on one page. To get around just scroll up or
                            down or use your Back button.

***
Site Meter
***

Below are some songs we like and the words to some of the dances we do. Most of them came from Peter Hoover. Some of them I grabbed from the MDDL. Check there for additional info and e-mail addresses of providers. Beware, most of the e-mail addresses in these credits are old! Anything else without attribution is of unknown origin and thought to be public domain/traditional. Revisions or additions are encouraged! (Write me.)

Note: You need the RealPlayer to play the audio files. You can get a free one at Real.com. Look for the FREE version.

Here are the songs, or the names of some of the tunes we dance to, that I have lyrics for.  Songs recorded at ales are now included in this list! Scroll down. Names and other references next to song titles apply to recordings.

(1987 New Haven Ale songs are not indexed on this list)

31st of April
5 Constipated Men of the Bible - all (excerpts only)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
A Bottle Of The Best - Aldoona? (1994 Ship Ale
All Because He Didn't Eat His Vegetables (aka Squalor by Lou and Peter Berryman) (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)(1989 Ale)
All For Me Grog (1994 Ship Ale)
All God's Critters (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
All Of Life Is Like A ? (Rosin up your bow?) - Saralinda (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Alligator Named Albert - Marty & Saralinda  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
A Night in El Paso (Frank) (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Another May Day Morning
Are You Shingling The Rum Sellers Roof – female (1994 Ship Ale)
Aura Lee – Glenda (1994 Ship Ale)
background noise, ? – male (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Beaux of London City
Because My Love Loves Me - Diana  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Bells Have Turned Green, (10/19/85)
Berryman song, talk of, and Like a Dog's Hair in a Jellybean – Chris (10/19/85)
Betsy Go Home - (10/19/85)
Big Ship (Frank Plunkett) (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Black Socks (round) – Marty (1986 Five Day Wonder) & (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Black Velvet Band - big guy and wife (1994 Ship Ale)
blessing – Jim (1989 NoWeare Ale)
Blue Bells of Scotland
Bonny Green Garters, Marty's version - w/ reptiles (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Boozing, Jim (1989 Merrie Sex Ale) &  big guy (1994 Ship Ale)
Bored of the Dance - Christine Gaca (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Branch Of May - Dudley Laufman (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Cape Cod Girls - Marty  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Charlie Brown – male (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Charly Mox Beer (tune of Diana) – Aldoona (1994 Ship Ale)
chicken and book and frog joke - Dudley Laufman (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Chicken On A Raft - Bob DuPre (1994 Ship Ale)
Chickens In The Yard - Glenda? (1994 Ship Ale)
Christ You Know It Ain't Easy - Mary Fish (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Circle of the Sun - all  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Clementine (10/19/85) , Aldoona (1994 Ship Ale)
Constant Billy
Country Life, w/ parody verses incomplete (10/19/85)
Cuckoo's Nest
Cutting More Wood - Aldoona? (1994 Ship Ale)
Daddy Take a Nap - (Frank)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Dance with Me - Saralinda  (1986 Five Day Wonder)  & Saralinda (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Days of the week song - Roger's English friend  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Dead Egyptian Blues – Glenda (1994 Ship Ale)
Diana - Aldoona and me (1994 Ship Ale)
Did You Ever See..., (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Diesel and Shale (10/19/85)
Diner song – male (1994 Ship Ale)
Dinosaur Song – Marnen (1994 Ship Ale)
ditty sample - Mary  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Dona - Diana  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Don't Have Any More Mrs Moore – male (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Down By The Green Woodside - Tom Gajowkski? (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Down On Old Bum Knee (10/19/85), Lindy (1986 Five Day Wonder), 2X (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Drinking Watneys
English condom joke - Dudley Laufman (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Every Propeller Is Turning/anti Soviet song – Roger (10/19/85)
F Word Song (Peter & Lou Berryman), talk of Berrymans (10/19/85)
Falling in Love Is Such A Pain - Connie? (1989 5 Day Wonder)
familiar tradtional -  female (The Blacksmith?) (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Father Come Home – Aldoona (1994 Ship Ale)
Fathom The Bowl (1989 Ale)
fiddle tune - Dudley Laufman (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Fields So Green
fireside (1989 NoWeare Ale)
Five Foot Flirt – female (1994 Ship Ale)
Garnett's Homemade Beer - all  (1986 Five Day Wonder) & (1994 Ship Ale)
George Washington Bridge (Man On The Flying Trapeze tune) (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Getting Upstairs
Glenda - ? (lots of background noise) (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Glorious Ale, female (1994 Ship Ale)  Jim (from the Clancy Brothers) (10/19/85)
Glorishears
Go Dig My Grave (Mary Fish)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Going Down on Old Bum Knee
Good Ale
Good Fellows Must Go Learn To Dance
Go To Sea Once More (Curtis on alternate harmony) (1994 Ship Ale)
Go Where I Send Thee – male (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Grizelda – male (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Hal and Tow
Hamlet - Aldoona? (1994 Ship Ale)
Happy Birthday
Hard Times (CP Line) – Glenda (1994 Ship Ale)
Haste To The Maypole (w/ accordion!) - Christine/all (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Henry Of Richmond – Jeff (1994 Ship Ale)
Here's Health to the Morris
Highland Mary
Holy Modal Rounders song (spaghetti/dishes) Marty  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Hoodoo Ball - Jim Blake  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
How Can I Keep From Singing (1989 Ale)
How Do They Do It?, Jim (1994 Ship Ale)
I Can't Help It If My Heart Is Big Enough For Two – Saralinda (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
I Have My Price - ? (1986 Five Day Wonder)
I Know that Someday I'll Be Singing Above (Diana)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
I Love a Moose - Mary  (1986 Five Day Wonder) & Mary (complete) (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
I walk with the tape recorder towards and into the dining hall (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
I Want A Beer Just Like Dear Old Dad – Malcolm (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
I'd rather be a woman than a poor hard working man (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
If I Could Return – Aldoona (1994 Ship Ale)
I'm Saved – Jim (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
I'm My Own Granda (1989 Ale)
Invitation To The Blues – Glenda (1994 Ship Ale)
Isle Au Haut (1994 Ship Ale)
John Barleycorn - Christine (Joan Sugerbeet version) (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Johnny Be Fair - Glenda  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Joy Of My Heart (one verse) – Glenda (1989 NoWeare Ale)
Keep In Mind That I Love You – female (1994 Ship Ale)
Keep The Home Fires Burning - Aldoona? (1994 Ship Ale)
Lads A Bunchum, (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Lancet Is The Beer For Me - female (sung to Yankee Doodle) (1994 Ship Ale)
Landlord Fill The Flowing Bowl (1989 Ale)
Leather Wing Bat? (Burl Ives) (10/19/85)
Let Union Be, Robert Mills? (1989 Merrie Sex Ale) & (1994 Ship Ale)
Let Your  Back and Sides Go Bare – Saralinda (1989 Merrie Sex Ale), (1989 Ale)
Lollipop Man
Lord of the Dance (end) (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Lord of the Dance (parody), Bored of the Dance - Christine Gaca (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Lumberjack Song - me and ... (1994 Ship Ale)
Lydia The Tatooed Lady (10/19/85)
Maid of the Mill
Make Your Money When You're Young – male (1989 NoWeare Ale)
Mama's Little Baby Loves Shortnin Bread – Mary (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Martin Said To His Man/Who's the Fool Now - all  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Marty tells joke (1986 Five Day Wonder)
McTavish Is Dead (Ted Kennedy version) – male (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Me Charmin' Little Russky? - big guy (Russian) (1994 Ship Ale)
Mexican Hat Dance song (10/19/85)
Milder & Molder & Festle & Foe - ? (1989 5 Day Wonder)
The Morris Dance
Movin' Day (Jim Kweskin) - Jim Blake  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
My Bonnie Ewe Tree - Mary  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
My God How the Money Rolls in - Mary  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
My Grandfather's Cock (Saralinda)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
My Husband Has No Courage in Him - all  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
My Name is Captain Kidd/As I Sailed (Marty)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
My Wife and the Devil (Mary)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Never Wed an Old Man, - all  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
No Courage In Him – Glenda (1994 Ship Ale)
Now I'm A Fucking Hero - Jim Blake (1989 NoWeare Ale)
NoWeare Ale Song - Sara Jane? (1989 NoWeare Ale)
Nutting Girl, (10/19/85), other lines  (1986 Five Day Wonder) & Jeff (1994 Ship Ale)
Odds of Going To Heaven - Jim Blake (1989 NoWeare Ale)
Off To The Rodeo - Mary  (1986 Five Day Wonder) & (1989 NoWeare Ale)
Oh The Hard Times of Old England – Aldoona (1994 Ship Ale)
Old Bones – Jim (1994 Ship Ale)
Old Dun Cow
Old Molly Oxford (Stepback)
Old Rose and Crown
Old Time Religion, (10/19/85) & (1986 Five Day Wonder), (see also a web page with more words)
Old Woman From Wexford  and then parody Old Lady From Venice (10/19/85)
Old Woman Tossed Up
On A Monday Morning - Mary Fish (1986 Five Day Wonder) & Mary? (1989 5 Day Wonder)
On Ilkla Moor Baht 'at (1989 Ale)
On The Good Ship Venus - Kevin & Saralinda  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
One Ton Of Mayo (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Paddling Out To Rahway (1994 Ship Ale)
Padstow May Day Song, Saralinda  (1986 Five Day Wonder) & short (1989 5 Day Wonder)
parody of little bird in modern times = ? (hard to hear.)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Phantom Flasher
Philosopher's Song - Roger and me (1994 Ship Ale)
Pleasant and Delightful, (1986 Five Day Wonder), 2X (1994 Ship Ale)
Pleasure To Know You – all (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Plowin on the Road - Frank  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Postman's Knock
Princess Royal
Rag Morris - The Song (this is a link to their page)
Reader's Digest Condensed version of Barrett's Privateers  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Respect for Paddy Murphy - Saralinda? (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Rigs o' Marlow
Ring Your Bells Morris Men
Rise up, Jock
Roast Beef Of Old England
Roger's Rev Prynne monologue on Dancing (1994 Ship Ale) & at 1983 12th Night (seperate clip)
Roll Down (1994 Ship Ale)
Roll Down To Rio (1994 Ship Ale)
Roll The Old Chariots Along – male (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Roll Your Leg Over - Barbara Ruth (many verses) (1994 Ship Ale)
Roll Your Leg Over - Saralinda  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Rolling Down to Old Maui - Saralinda  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Rolling The Woodpile Down - male (Way Down in Florida) (1989 5 Day Wonder)
Rosebud in June– Diana (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Rosie Get Out My Sunday Shoes - Aldoona? (1994 Ship Ale)
Rosin The Beau  - all, Diana (1989 Merrie Sex Ale) & Tom French (1989 5 Day Wonder), 1989 Ale
Rosin Up Your Bow – female (1994 Ship Ale)
Rum By Gum - Jim (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Runnin' Down To Cuba - Aldoona? (1994 Ship Ale)
Safety Net – Glenda (1994 Ship Ale)
Save Your Money While You're Young
Shepherd's Hey
Sing... (?) – Glenda (1994 Ship Ale)
South Australia
spoken piece on country dancing - Dudley Laufman (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Sportsmen Arise/Innocent Hare (10/19/85)
Staines Morris
Star Of The County Down - big guy and wife (1994 Ship Ale)
Stars And Stripe Forever – Jim (1994 Ship Ale)
Stepback - see Old Molly Oxford
Step and Fetch Her
Steve Goodman's Vegematic song, excerpts of (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Streets of Laredo parody - Barbara Ruth (singing ON KEY!!) (1994 Ship Ale)
Strike The Bell, big guy (1994 Ship Ale)
Success To The Farmer - Bill Fisher? (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Sweet Jenny Jones
Take Her In Your Arms – Mary (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Take Me Out To The Ballpark – male (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
That's the Way for Me (Diana)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
The 20th Century Is Almost Over - Jim and all (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
The Barley Mow (1994 Ship Ale)
The Bonny Black Hair (pubic hair) Marty  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
The Child On Her Knee – female (1994 Ship Ale)
The Great Storm Is Over - Aldoona (1994 Ship Ale)
The Grey Funnel Line - female (w/ Grey Flannel verse) (1994 Ship Ale)
The Instrument (parody of the Cuckoo's Nest) Saralinda  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
The Keeper - Mary  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
The Logger - Saralinda  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
The Old Dunn Cow - Roger and all (1986 Five Day Wonder) & (1994 Ship Ale)
The Phantom Flasher  (parody of The Keeper) – Jim (1986 Five Day Wonder)
The Philosopher's Song – Roger (1986 Five Day Wonder)
The Scotsman - Mary  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
The Seven Deadly Sins! - Christine Gaca (Nancy Winnig cough) (1989 5 Day Wonder)
The Times To Come (What Can You Do) – Marnen (1994 Ship Ale)
The Vicar and The Frog - big guy (1994 Ship Ale)
The Woman of Ipanema (parody of the Girl From Ipanema) (1989 5 Day Wonder)
There's No Way To ? Its Comin Every Day – Jim (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
They're Always in the Way- Mary  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Three Drunken Maidens - Saralinda  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Three Gypsys - ? (beautiful voice)  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Three Legged Man – Jim (1994 Ship Ale)
Trunkles
Twelfth Night Song
unknown short song– male (1989 5 Day Wonder)
unknown song - Christine  w/ accordion (1989 5 Day Wonder)
unknown song - Curtis, Connie (1989 5 Day Wonder)
unknown song - Diana (1989 5 Day Wonder)
unknown song - Diana (1989 5 Day Wonder)
unknown song - Diana - pretty/quiet (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
unknown song – female (1994 Ship Ale)
unknown song – male (1994 Ship Ale)
unknown song (Shady Grove?) – Glenda (1989 NoWeare Ale)
unknown song ...for fish and things that swim in rivers... (10/19/85)
unknown song about women's lib! - ? (1994 Ship Ale)
unknown song excerpt – Glenda (1994 Ship Ale)
unknown song– female (1989 NoWeare Ale)
Waltzing with Bears - ? (1986 Five Day Wonder)
What Do Doggies Do When They Get Boogers – Christine (1989 5 Day Wonder)
When Jone's Ale Was New (1989 Ale)
When I Play The Fiddle - Dudley Laufman (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
When I was in My Prime/The Heart of Mine - Diana  (1986 Five Day Wonder)
When We Go Rolling Home (1994 Ship Ale)
Where I Have Been Many A Time - male (who is this?) (1989 NoWeare Ale)
White Collar Holler - Jim? (1994 Ship Ale)
Why Men Should Grow a Mustache - Jim Blake (1986 Five Day Wonder)
Why Paddy's Not At Work Today - Aldoona? (1994 Ship Ale)
Why Should We Forsake Good Liquor - (1986 Five Day Wonder) & (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Winster Processional
Woodchuck – Glenda (1994 Ship Ale)
World's Last Whale - Saralinda? (1989 Merrie Sex Ale)
Would You Like to Swing On A Star – all (1986 Five Day Wonder)
You're Drunk (snippet) – Mary (1986 Five Day Wonder)
You've Got To Make Hey When The Sunshines - (Sara Jane?) (1989 NoWeare Ale)

(back to top)

Some links for more songs:
Wally's Traditional Music page!
The Digital Tradition (at the Mudcat Cafe. Use the search)
NY Pinewoods Folk Music Club
Sea shantys


(return to main page)


Let the singing begin!

31st of April
(from May Day, 1985)
tune = blue eyed stranger  (Headington)
to be sung with the dance
(c) 1985 by Jim Blake. All rights reserved. From Jim: "Feel free to perform this,
but if you make a lot of money from it, I will want my cut." james.blake@ensco.com

Hear it sung by Jim himself. a RealAudio file ---> 31april.rm

chorus
Have you heard the music
Have you heard the bells
Have you seen the sticks they've cracked and broke
No one does the dances half so well as the highly celebrated Hearts of Oak

Late one night I was sitting in a chair
when I thought I heard a funny noise outside
up I rose and went out into the square
I beheld a site to make my eyes grow wide

Hankies in their hands, ribbons in their hair,
never had I seen such peculiar folk
Stamping on the ground and shouting to the air
come and dance the Morris with hearts of oak

chorus

On and on they continued through the night
'Till I felt for certain that their legs would drop
As I stood there arrested by the site I began to wonder would they ever stop

Pausing just a moment for half a case of beer, whiskey from the bottle and a smoke
forming up a side they called for me to hear, come and dance the morris with the hearts of oak

chorus

left right left and the hankies up and down
they explain each figure every step and turn
up and back and you circle all around while I listened closely and I tried to learn
But, stumbling on my feet 'till I could nearly scream
feeling like a fool or an awful joke
well looking at me now no one could ever dream I could dance the morris with the hearts of oak

chorus

so late one night if you're sitting in a chair and you're not quite certain that you hear a sound
rise on up and go out into the square when you see the dancing this is what you've found
hankies in our hands ribbons in our hair
no one but the finest dancing folk
stamping on the ground and shouting to the air
come and dance the morris with the hearts of oak

chorus

**********************************************************************
Another May Day Morning
(from May Day 1986)
(c) 1986 by Jim Blake. All rights reserved. From Jim: "Feel free to perform this, but if you make a lot of money from it, I will want my cut." james.blake@ensco.com

Hear it sung by Jim himself. a RealAudio file ---> anothermaydaymorning.rm

chorus
Another May Day morning new life in the ground
let's sing a song to greet the day
let's fill our lungs with the air of may
let's watch the winter float away
and pass the bottle round
let's watch the winter float away and pass the bottle round

look at the sunrise on the river, one more year it's springtime again
april has promised, may delivers, one more may day morning

winter at last has past behind us, cold I was, how cold it has been,
summer is creeping up to find us, one more may day morning

chorus

such a brave crowd and such ambition, traveling here at break of day
carrying on the old tradition, one more may day morning

singing and standing here together, magic runs within our ring
bringing about a change in the weather one more may day morning

chorus

****************************************************************
Beaux of London City

From Neil Jennings:
I have unearthed a broadsheet song which may be the origins of Beaux of London City. It is in the Bodleian Ballad collection, called 'The knowing maccaroni outwitted" and dates from sometime
between 1780 and 1812. The words seem to fit the Adderbury tune quite well... It looks like part of a longer song, but only these three verses are on the page.
 

The knowing maccaroni outwitted
[c. 1780-1812]
Tune: Beaux of London City (Adderbury version)

You beaux of London city, likewise St. Jame's park
Give ear unto my ditty, tis of a frolicksome spark
It is one of our dear brothers that lately was betrayed
It was by Mrs. Susan the lady's waiting maid.

His hair being oil'd and powder'd, hung dangling to his waist
No fop could be e'er go fine, his cloaths embroidered with lace
With snuff-box in his pocket as I [d]o you suppose
As large as any turnip, for to perfume his nose.

He stept to Mrs. Susan, to whom his fancy led
A guinea he would give to gain her maidenhead.
Get you to Covent Garden, to Fleet Street or the Strand,
And there for half the money you may have one at your command.
 

********************************************************************
Bells Have Turned Green
       (A Morris parody of Fiddler's Green)

As I walked by the brewery one evening so rare, To view the still vats and to sniff the malt air, I heard an old Morris man singin' this song, Oh bury me here boys, my galleys have gone.

Chorus:
Dress me up in me bells and me baldric,
No more in the pubs I'll be seen,
Just tell me old sidemates, I'm takin' a ride, mates, And I'll see you someday when your bells have turned green.

Now `Bells Have Turned Green' is a pub I've heard tell, Where Morris men go when they don't go to hell, Where the beer is all pretty and the girls are all free, And they'll take you to heaven and won't charge a fee.

Where the sun always shines when you dance Shepherd's Hey, And you don't need a squire to show you the way. And the foreman is there, oh his smile is so sweet, Perfumes of Araby rise from his feet.

Where Esslinger beer is a beer that is banned, And the fool never buggers a dance that is planned. The bagman is there buying drinks by the score, And everyone says, `Good, let's have twenty more!'

Now, life has been good, boys. I've had a fair part, And from your kind comp'ny I'll happily depart. These words slowly dripped from his lips and his jaw, And he sank down content in the booze on the floor.

--To the tune of "Fiddler's Green", with apologies.
From Mary of Northampton Morris who heard it from Lou Killen, who collected it in England.

************************************************************************
Blue Bells of Scotland (Adderbury)
[from Rich Holmes (rsholmes@mailbox.syr.edu)]
We sing

Oh where, and oh where,
has my Highland laddie gone?
Oh where, and oh where,
has my Highland laddie gone?
 

from Sandy Glover , St Albans Morris Men, sandyglover@writeme.com

Oh where, and oh where, has my highland laddie gone?
He's gone to the wars (or hills), with his tartan Y-fronts on.

from "Jonno B" <plonker@dialstart.net>

Oh where, and oh where,
has my Highland laddie gone?
He's gone to the wars,
with his tartan jockstrap on.

************************************************************************
Bonny Green Garters
From Jim Blake (written by members of the Hearts of Oak [Dorothy Bukantz, et al.] circa 1982)

Here's to the Morris, we'll dance the dance well
And teach our sons and our daughters
Here's to our ribbons and here's to our bells
And here's to our bonny green garters
 

A more adult version, collected from England via the MDDL:

Here's to the lasses
We love them so well
Though some are regular tarters (sp?)
Off with their knickers
And off with their bras
And to hell with their bonny green garters
 

Peter Thomas of East Kent adds:
The spiel goes along the line of "composed by Henry VIII and he allowed any
lady wearing a green garter to join in the dance. We follow this tradition
and any lady wearing a green garter may join in. If she shows it to all the
men in the side first." We have not yet been taken up on it though several
have proved they are not!

Pete added 1/21/02
"The last comment is no longer true as at The Ship Inn at Sandgate on Boxing
Day a lady from the audience lifted her skirt and showed a Green Garter to
everyone including the audience and joined in the dance."
 

From Rich Holmes (rsholmes@mailbox.syr.edu) The "traditional" words are something along the lines of

Here's to the ladies, we love them so well
Though some are regular tartars
Here's to their stockings and here's to their shoes
And here's to their bonny green garters
 

Some teams (mostly Morris Ring, I gather) sing the last two lines as

. . . Off with their knickers and off with their bras
And off with their bonny green garters
 

Thornden hasn't done BGG in a while, but I think they used to sing something like

Here's to our stockings and here's to our shoes
And here's to our bonny green garters
A pair for me and a pair for you
And a pair for whoever comes after
 

The Hounds sing the following, written I believe by someone in the Midwest who is or was on the morris list (Marty, ex-New Haven?)(and subsequently folk-processed a little [the song, not the author])

Here's to the lizards, we love them so well
Though some are really iguaners
Here's to the snakes and the toads and the frogs
And here's to the bonny green garters
 

Abby Cameron, Squire, Rock Creek Morris Women, adds: Here's how we sing it in DC...

Here's to the Women that do the dance well
And pass it on to our daughters
Here's to our ribbons and here's to our bells
But chuck the bonny green garters
 

From the White Rats courtesy of Leigh Ann Hussey <leighann@sybase.com>

Black Leather Garters

Here's to the Tops, we love them so well,
Though some are very slow starters.
Here's to their whips and here's to their belts,
And here's to their black leather garters.

Here's to the bottoms, we love them so well,
Though some are regular martyrs.
Here's to their screams and here's to their welts,
And here's to their black leather garters.
 

From Sarah Crofts  <S.J.Crofts@GREENWICH.AC.UK> This is the song Dacre Morris sing for Bonny Green:
(obviously best sung when there are other, male morris teams around).

Here's to the fellers, they're ugly as hell,
It's hard to stifle our laughter,
They whisper sweet nothings and jingle our bells,
But we know bloody well what they're after!

************************************************************************
Boozing

Now what are the joys of a single young man?
Why boozing, bloody well boozing
And what is he doing whenever he can?
Why boozing, bloody well boozing
You may think I'm wrong or you may think I'm right
I'm not going to argue, I know you can fight
But what do you think we are doing tonight?
Why boozing, bloody well boozing

Boozing, boozing just you and I
Boozing, boozing, when we are dry
Some do it openly, some on the sly
But we all are bloody well boozing

And what are the joys of a poor married man?
And what is he doing whenever he can?
He comes home at night and he gives his wife all
He goes out a shopping, makes many a  call
But what brings him home hanging on to the wall?

And what does the Salvation Army run down?
And what are they damning in every town?
They stand on street corners, they rant and they shout
They shout about things they know nothing about
But what are they doing when the lights are all out?

************************************************************************
Constant Billy
[from Don Ulin (ulind@ucs.indiana.edu)]

Oh, my Billy, my constant Billy,
When shall I see my Billy again?
When the fishes fly over the ocean,
Then shall you see your Billy again.
 

[from Rich Holmes (rsholmes@mailbox.syr.edu)]
I believe Adderbury sings something like:

Oh, my Billy, my constant Billy,
When will I see my Billy again?
When the fishes fly over the mountains,
That's when I'll see my Billy again.

before the dance, and in the last chorus.

Billy again, Billy again,
Billy again, Billy again,
Oh, my Billy, my constant Billy,
When will I see my Billy again?
 

Constant Billy (Headington)
[from Rich Holmes (rsholmes@mailbox.syr.edu); from Sharp's Morris Book (vol. 1): Sharp gives some background on the history of the songs etc. which I won't transcribe here]

O Constant Billy
Shall I go with 'ee?
O when shall I see
My Billy again?
 

(Bampton)

O my Billy, my constant Billy,
When shall I see my Billy again?
When the fishes fly over the mountains,
Then you will see your Billy again.

************************************************************************
COUNTRY LIFE

chorus:
I like to rise when the sun she rises,
early in the morning
And I like to hear them small birds singing,
Merrily upon their layland
And hurrah for the life of a country boy,
And to ramble in the new mown hay.

1. In summer when the summer is hot
   We sing, and we dance, and we drink a lot
   We spend all night in sport and play
   And go rambling in the new mown hay

2 In autumn when the oak trees turn
   We gather all the wood that's fit to burn
   We cut and stash and stow away
   And go rambling in the new mown hay

3. In winter when the sky's gray
   we hedge and ditch our times away,
   but in summer when the sun shines gay,
   We go ramblin' through the new mowed hay.

4. In spring we sow at the harvest mow
   And that is how the seasons round they go
   but of all the times choose I may
   I'd be rambling through the new mowed hay

5. Oh Nancy is my darling gay
   And she blooms like the flowers every day
   But I love her best in the month of May
   When we're rambling through the new mown hay

NYC verse
    I like to rise when the sun she rises
    Early in the morning
    I like to hear those cockroaches munching
    merrily on those breadcrumbs
    Hurrah for the life of a city boy
   When we rumble down East Broadway

Morris verse
   I like to hear the Morris dancers
   Clash their sticks and drink fine ale
   I like to hear those bells a-ringing
   As we ramble in the new mown hay

   In the winter time, when the world is quiet
   We'll go into the woods AND WE'LL START A RIOT!
   We'll catch those birdies where they lay
   And we'll roast 'em in the new mown hay

    For, I hates to rise when the sun she rises
    Early on the morning
    I hates to hear those small birds singing, dirty little bastards
    A pox on the life of a country boy
    I'm allergic to the new mown hay (Achoo)

 (Original lyrics Recorded by Watersons - For Pence and Spicy Ale, revisions edited by John Lippincott, last two verses from Jim Van Fleet)

************************************************************************
Cuckoo's Nest
[from "Morris On", John Kirkpatrick et al.,
via Art Kaufmann (afk@dat.elsegundoca.ncr.com)]

As I was a walkin' one morning in May
I met a pretty fair maid and unto her did say,
For love I'm inclined
And I'll tell you me mind
That me inclination lies in your cuckoo's nest

Me darlin, says she, I am innocent and young,
And I scarcely can believe your false deluding tongue,
Yet I see it in your eyes,
And it fills me with surprise
That your inclination lies in me cuckoo's nest.

 Some like a girl who is pretty in the face,
 And some like a girl who is slender in the waist,
 Buit I like a girl
 Who will wriggle and will twist
 At the bottom of the belly lies the cuckoo's nest.

Then me darlin', says he, If you see it in me eyes,
Then think of it as fondness and do not be surprised,
For I love you me dear,
And I'll marry you, I swear,
If you'll let me clap my hand upon your cuckoo's nest.

Me darlin, says she, I can do no such thing,
For me mother often told me it was committing sin,
Me maidenhead to lose,
And me sex to be abused,
So have no more to do with me cuckoo's nest.

 Some like a girl who is pretty in the face,
 And some like a girl who is slender in the waist,
 But I like a girl
 Who will wriggle and will twist
 At the bottom of the belly lies the cuckoo's nest.

Me darlin', says he, it is not committing sin,
But common sense should tell you it is a pleasing thing,
You were brought into this world,
To increase and do your best,
And to help a man to heaven in your cuckoo's nest.

Then me darlin, says she, I cannot you deny,
For you've surely won my heart by the rovin' of your eye,
Yet I see it in your eyes,
That your courage is surprise,
So gently lift your hand in me cuckoo's nest.

 Some like a girl who is pretty in the face,
 And some like a girl who is slender in the waist,
 But I like a girl
 Who will wriggle and will twist
 At the bottom of the belly lies the cuckoo's nest.

So this couple they got married and soon they went to bed,
And now this pretty fair maid has lost her maidenhead,
In a small country cottage,
They increase and do their best,
And he often claps his hand on her cuckoo's nest.

 Some like a girl who is pretty in the face,
 And some like a girl who is slender in the waist,
 But I like a girl
 Who will wriggle and will twist
 At the bottom of the belly lies the cuckoo's nest.
 

[from the singing of Jean Redpath via Ishmael the Fiddler (ijs@eddie.mit.edu]  (1st version of 1st verse courtesy of Leigh Ann Hussey <leighann@sybase.com>)

The Cuckoo's Nest

There is a thorny bush in our kale yard,
There is a thorny bush in our kale yard,
At the back o'th' thorny bush, there is a lad and lass,
And they're busy busy havin' at the cuckoo's nest.

There is a thorn bush, in our _____
There is a thorn bush, in our _____
At the back of there'n bush there is a leaden glass,
And they're busy busy having at the cuckoo's nest.

Chorus:
It's hey the cuck and ho the cuck and hie the cuckoo's nest,
It's hey the cuck and ho the cuck and hie the cuckoo's nest,
I'll gie anybody a shilling and a bottle of the best,
If they'll rumple up the feathers in the cuckoo's nest.

It is thorned, it is coppiced, it is prickled all around,
It is thorned, it is compassed and it isn't easy found,
She said young man you're plundering, I said it is nae true,
But I left her with the makings of a young cuckoo.

Chorus

Some like a lassie who is gaily dressed,
And some like a lassie who is tight about the waist,
But it's in amongst the blankets that I like the best,
For to get a jolly rattle at the cuckoo's nest.

Chorus
 

and from Sandy Glover, St Albans Morris Men, sandyglover@writeme.com

The Jean Redpath "Cuckoo's Nest".   In my youth in Scotland, I learned the
first lines from several 'traditional' singers as   "There is a bonnie briar
bush in our kail yard" (kail yard=vegetable garden).
************************************************************************
Drinking Watneys
to the tune of "Captain Kidd";
from Bob Berrier (rberrier@pop3.esslink.com)

Drinking Watney's leads to tears
I shall teach, I shall teach
Drinking Watney's leads to tears, I shall teach,
Drinking Watney's leads to tears
And the falling off of ears
And the parts that other beers cannot reach, cannot reach.

(Watney's had a slogan about reaching the parts that other beers cannot reach. I think the tune is Admiral Benbow. Another song I wish I'd written).

*************************************************************************
Fields So Green
[from Jeff Bigler (jcb@MIT.EDU)] for music, see "authoritative version"
 

   1. At sunrise on Beltane the pagans all come
       To the banks of the river where the dancing is done.
       And they smile and nod wisely for they understand
       That the dancing is done for the land.

       For they've read all about it in magical texts,
       Of fertility rites danced in six person sets.
       And they say they're sincere but there's hardly a chance
       That they'll get up and join in the dance.

       Chorus:
       But I dance for the fields, I dance for the land,
       With my bells and my ribbons and my hankies in hand.
       Each time that I caper, the higher I leap,
       That much more grow the barley and wheat,
       From the magic I dance with my feet.

    2. The dancers today are not of the same stock
       And the crops and the fields have long been forgot;
       For the magic is far less important today
       Than which way to go in a hey.

       At the ales where they gather the dancers do roam
       Through parking lots, malls and retirement homes;
       And the one thing that's foremost in all of their minds
       Is the contra dance later that night.

    3. The crops of today are all grown by machines,
       And there's no place for magic in today's planting schemes.
       More important is yield per acre of land,
       And their parents and children be damned.

       And they've all got their bottles that they highly rate
       Of fertility magic trichlorosulfate.
       Yet all of their chemistry still can't explain
       Why the fields where we dance are so green.

    4. Now I live in a city and I dance in the streets
       Where there's no growing thing within five hundred feet.
       And the crowd asks us ``Hey, what are you s'posed to be?''
       Or they shout things I will not repeat.

       And we write city hall for permission to dance,
       And we drive ninety minutes for a half-hour stand.
       But the magic begins when we form up the set,
       And it still works despite the cement.

       Alternate chorus, sung after the last verse:
       For I think of the fields, I think of the land
       Each time I wear bells and take hankies in hand.
       And I know when I caper, the higher I leap,
       Somewhere tall grow the barley and wheat,
       For the magic still works from the streets.

       After alternate chorus, end with normal chorus.

Copyright © 1992, 1994 by Jeff Bigler. Permission is hereby granted to copy and/or distribute this music or lyrics by
any means for any non-commercial purpose, provided that this copyright notice is included. Permission is also granted
to perform this piece before an audience of five hundred (500) or fewer people. Any other use, including but not limited
to publication for profit, performance before an audience of more than five hundred (500) people, or recording, requires
the author's expressed consent.

If you want a hardcopy, I recommend downloading the Postscript version (generated by MusicTeX).

1996/12/26 12:34:50 version, grabbed 6/12/98

************************************************************************
Getting Upstairs
[Headington version; from John Walker (jawalk04@ukcc.uky.edu)]

Some like coffee, some like tea,
Some like a pretty girl just like me(she).

From Neil Jennings (neiljennings@fsbdial.co.uk)
(Dubai Sharjah Morris, 1978-1982)

Some like coffee, some like tea
Some like a pretty girl just like me
Such a getting upstairs and playing on the fiddle
Such a getting upstairs I never did see

************************************************************************
Glorious Ale
[From Nick Robertshaw (bignick@clark.net) of Foggy Bottom Morris.]

When I was a young man my father did say
The Summer is comin' 'tis time to make hay
And when hay's been carted don't you ever fail
to drink gaffer's health in a pint of good ale

CHORUS:
Ale, Ale, Glorious Ale
Served up in pewter, it tells its own tale
Some folks like radishes, some cur-lie kale
But give I boiled parsnips and a gert dish of taters
and a lump of fatty bacon, and a pint of good ale

Our MP's in parliament our faith for to keep
And I hope now we've put 'im there he won't sit and sleep
He'll always get my vote if he doesn't fail
To bring down the price of our good english ale

CHORUS

Some folks is teetotallers, they drink water neat
It must rot their gutses and give 'em damp feet
But as for my part I know I'll not fail
On boiled beef and bacon and Good English Ale

CHORUS
************************************************************************
Glorishears
From Mike Heaney (mh@bodley.ox.ac.uk)

7/11/99
The notation I made up on the spot to convey the tune. Would be better in ABC if I knew it!

PS I did publish the tune in The Morris Dancer Vol 1 no.8 (1980) 12-14. The tune is also given in C. Simpson's The British Broadside Ballad and its Music (1966) p.522.

[Key of C, 4/4 time, 1=whole note/semibreve, 2=halfnote/minim &c, *=dotted,|= bar line, scale CDEFGABcdefga, low-high]

Use a nonproportional font and it'll match up
 

ccccC | EGG | ccBAGF | EFGG |
48844 | 442 | 488488 | 8842 |

cccc*e | dcded*e | fedcggf | ec ||
4884*8 | 88884*8 | 8888488 | 22 ||

ffffag | fedcd*d | cccced | cBAGGAB |
488488 | 88884*8 | 488488 | 8888488 |

cBAGFE | F*GA*A | GgcEF | GC ||
488488 | 4*84*8 | 44488 | 22 ||

Source for words:

The modern prophets: or, New wit for a husband. A comedy, as it is acted at the Theatre Royal in Drury-Lane, by Her Majesty's Servants. Writen by Mr. Tho. D'Urfey. London: Printed for Bernard Lintott ..., [1709]

[The text refers to events of 1706 and 1707]

p.45
Now, now comes on the glorious year,
Britain has hopes and France has fear,
Lewis, the war has cost so dear,
He slily peace does tender;
But our two Hero's so well know
The breach of his word some years ago,
They resolve they will give him the other blow,
Unless he Spain surrender.

Health to the Queen then straight begin,
To Marlborough the Great and to brave Eugene;
With them let valiant Webb to come in,
Who late perform'd a wonder:
Then to the ocean an offering make
And boldly carouse to brave Sir John Leak,
Who with mortar and cannon Mahone did take,
And made the Pope knock under.

Beat up the drum a new alarm,
The foe is cold and we are warm,
The Monsieur's troops can do no harm,
Though they abound in numbers;
Push them once more and the war is done,
Old men and boys will surely run;
And we know we can beat them if four to one,
Which he too well remembers.

There were also parodies of this, but I suspect the tune was used just as a tune by fiddlers, and not for its lyrics.
 

<>************************************************************************
Going Down on Old Bum Knee
(Hear this sung at the 5 Day Wonder, 1986.   Click on the RealAudio file "30.rm".)
or at the 1986 Merrie Sex Middle Mac Ale.

Chorus
Going down on old bum knee again, me boys
Going down on old bum knee
We're homeward bound, ace bandage bound
Going down on old bum knee

It's a damn hard life, full of toil and strife
we Morris men undergo
We don't give a damn when the ale is done, how hard the ground below
for we're homeward bound to the piper's sound, and a caper taught for three
And we don't give a damn when we drink our ale
Going down on old bum knee

Once more we're found sitting on the ground with ice upon the sprain
Our mainspring sprung, our flailing done, we soon will feel the pain
Even now the big black welts rise up where our kneecaps used to be
If I ever get cured, I'll praise the Lord, going down on old bum knee

************************************************************************
Good  Ale

It is of good ale to you I'll sing
and to good ale i'll always cling
I like my mug filled to the brim
and I'll drink all you'd like to bring

good ale, thou art my darling
thou art my joy, both night and morning

it is you that helps me with my work
and from the task I'll never shirk
while I can get a good home brew
and better than one pint, I like two

I love you in the early morn
I love you in the daylight, dark and dawn
and when I'm weary worn or spent
I'll turn the tap and ease the vent

It is you that makes my friends my foes
it is you that makes me wear old clothes
but since you comes so near me nose
it's up ya comes and down ya goes

and if all my friends from Adam's race
was to meet me all in one place
I would part from them all without a tear
rather than part from from my good beer

and if my wife should me despise
how quickly I'd give her two black eyes
But if she loved me as I love thee
what a happy couple we would be

you have caused me debt and I've often swore
I would never drink strong ale anymore
but you for all that I would forgive
and I'll drink strong ale for as long as I live

************************************************************************
Good Fellows Must Go Learn To Dance
 

Good Fellows must go learn to dance, the summer is full near-a.
There is a branle come out of France, the trickíst you heard this year-a.
For I must leap, and thou must hop, and we must turn all three-a,
The fourth must bounce it like a top, and so we shall agree-a.
I pray thee, Minstrel, make no stop, for we will merry be-a.

A band of bells in bawdrick wise would deck us in our kind-a;
A shirt after the Morris guise, to flounce it in the wind-a;
A Whiffler for to make the way, and May brought in with all-a,
Is braver than the sun, I say, and passeth Round or Branle-a.
For we will trip so trick and gay, that we will pass them all-a.

Draw to dancing, neighbours all, good fellows, hip is best-a;
It skills not if we take a fall, in honouring this feast-a;
The squire will thank us for our glee, the world will us behold-a;
O where will all this dancing be? In Kent or in Cotswold-a?
Our Lord doth know, so axe not me, and so my tale is told-a.
 
 

Imprinted at London in Flete Strete at the sign of the Faucon, by Wylliam Gryffith, and
are to be sold at his shoppe in S. Dunstones Church Yearde, 1569.

Second Edition imprinted at London by William Chappell, in 'Popular Music of the
Olden Time', Volume 1, Page 243.

Third Edition imprinted, with minor alterations, at St Albans, by Sandy Glover, 1989.
St Albans Morris Men, sandyglover@writeme.com  See website

Sung by Sandy Glover, initially to Winster Processional tune, but latterly to 'Kemp's
Jig', as being more in keeping with the date of the words.

And a note from Sandy  6/13/98,
... I attach a copy of "Good Fellows Must Go Learn to Dance". This is
hardly a popular song, since I think I'm the first person to sing it in
400-odd years, but it is the oldest "Morris" song I've ever seen. As you'll
see, I got it from Chappell, where it is about a wedding. I changed the word
'bridal' to 'summer', and 'bride' to 'squire', and dropped one verse -
otherwise, it's as published in 1569. I particularly like the description in
Verse 2. I experimented a lot with tunes, and I've settled on Kemp's Jig,
primarily because of the match on period. I sing it with 2 'A' music and 3
'B' music, though I have tended to 'bend' the third 'B', especially on the
last verse.
 

*********************************************************************
Hal and Tow

Chorus:  Hal and tow, jolly ramble o
  We were up, long before the day o
  To welcome in the summer
  To welcome in the May o
  For summer is a comin in
  And winter's gone away o

Take this corn to weather corn (?) (crown/wear the crown?)
It was the crest when you were born
Your father's father wore it
And your father wore it too

What's happened to the Spaniards
That made the greater boast o
for they shall eat the feathered goose
And we shall eat the roast o

Robin Hood and Little John
Have both come to the fair o
And we will to the merry green wood
to hunt the buck and hare o

You bless the merry Moses
And all the power and might o
And send this peace to England
Send peace by day and night o
 

A slightly different version from Greg Tingey (SARASTRO@DIAL.PIPEX.COM).
"...the version I posted is based on that used by The Watersons' but I am not certain that I have not
changed the words slightly. BTW it should be "Take no scorn to wear the horn" in the first line ,
and I have so altered it below. Greg. T." 7/12/99

Take no scorn to wear the horn, it was the crest when you was born,
Your father's father wore it,
An your father wore it too.

                Hal-an-Tow!  Jolly rumbelow!
We were up, long before the day, oh!
To welcome in the Summer, to welcome in the May oh!
The Summer is a coming in, an' Winters' gone away oh!

What 'appened to the Spaniards that made so great a boast oh?
Why they should eat the feathered goose,
And we shall eat the roast, oh!
                Hal-an-Tow!  Jolly rumbelow!    (etc … )

Robin Hood and Little John, they've both come to the fair oh!
An' we will to the merry Greenwood,
To hunt the buck and hare, oh!
                Hal-an-Tow!  Jolly rumbelow!    ( etc … )

Now bless then Mary, Moses, and all their power and might, oh!
And send us peace to England,
And peace by day and night oh!
                Hal-an-Tow!  Jolly rumbelow!    ( etc … )
 

Another version from an anonymous source, 10/25/00:
I did some morris dancing once. And this is how we sung this. I'm not
sure if it's right but this is how we sung it:

>Take this corn to weather corn (?) (crown/wear the crown?)

I think we did it: "take no scorn to weather horn" it doesn't make any
more sense then yours but that's how we sung it.

>That made the greater boast o

>You bless the merry Moses

"God bless the merry muses
and all their power and might o
and send this peace to England
And peace be day and night o"

From Rose Regina Lawrence <NotEliane@aol.com> (I corrected some spelling. JL)
this verse I got from Saralinda, to my knowledge it was made up by her
and her daughter Joli:

Hal and tow, Jolly bungalow
we were up long before the day-o
to make a bunch of sandwiches, sandwiches with mayo

************************************************************************
Happy Birthday Dirge (tune = Song of the Volga Boatmen)
(See also the here for the more verses or search online for the Happy Birthday Dirge.)

Mianus tradition says you sing this rugby verse first (different tune)

Why were you born so beautiful?
Why were you born at all?
You're no bloody use to anyone.
You're no bloody use at all.

Happy Birthday, Happy Birthday

All the world's in dark despair     or    Death, destruction and despair
People dying everywhere, but...         People dying everywhere

Easter bunny broke both legs
Blood all over the Easter eggs

Now that you're the age you are
Your demise cannot be far, so...

I'm a lepper can't you see
Get your Birthday hugs from me.

Better marry very soon
Baby's due the next full moon...

I like children, yes I do
Baked or boiled or in a stew, but...

May the cities in your wake       or     May the candles on your cake
Burn like candles on your cake...      Burn like cities in your wake

Here's a lesson you should learn
Always pillage *BEFORE* you burn...

Kill the women, burn the keep
Maim the children but save the sheep!

Make the women wail and weep,
slay them all but SPARE THE SHEEP!

May your deeds with sword and axe
Equal those with sheep and yaks...

collected from the MDDL w/ contributions form various other sources.

************************************************************************
Here's Health to the Morris [sung to the tune "The Old Rose and Crown," by Ian Robb]
{by John Mayberry and Jamie Beaton of the Toronto Morris Men [from David Meddows-Taylor (taylor@IO.ORG)]}

Good friends gather round and I'll sadly relate
The misfortunes that Morris has suffered of late.
These gimmicks and dances in styles newly grown
Have diminished a dance that once stood on its own.

(Chorus) Oh, what has become of the simple half-rounds?
         The foot-up, the whole-hey that old Cecil wrote down?
         For bells, sticks and hankies and a pint of good beer
         Were once reckoned enough to bring pleasure and cheer.

O where are the dances we all used to know?
When a team would do Trunkles to start off a show?
Then the Rose, and crown it with Idbury Hill
Not the Ox Dance, Mr. Softie and Jamaica Farewell. (Chorus)

There'll soon come a day when they'll dance to the tune
of Jumping Jack Flash played on bones and bassoon,
Six cowboys on tricycles roaring around,
Numbers two, four and six being whirled upside down. (Chorus)

But the worst of it all's what they've done to the Ales
Where the flash made up show dance is the rule that prevails
And the drinking and singing, carousing all night
Give way to concern that the baby's all right. (Chorus)

So all you good people, come raise up your glass.
Let us hope that these bold innovations pass.
Here's health to the Morris, of all dances the best.
Those who find it too hard can sink to Northwest. (Chorus)

************************************************************************
Highland Mary
[from Don Ulin (ulind@ucs.indiana.edu)]

Around sweet Highland Mary's grave,
we'll plant the fairest of lilies,
The primrose sweet, and violet blue,
likewise the daffodillies.
But since this world's been grown so wide,
In some lonesome place we'll tarry,
Welcome then gather me to sleep,
with my Highland Mary.

From Neil Jennings (neiljennings@fsbdial.co.uk)
Highland Mary - is a song by (or attributed to) Burns, don't know if the
tune is the same. See Bodley ballads.
************************************************************************
How do they do it?
(from the Mixed Morris Ale, 1988)
(c) 1988 by Jim Blake. All rights reserved. From Jim: "Feel free to perform this,
but if you make a lot of money from it, I will want my cut." james.blake@ensco.com

Hear it sung by Jim himself. a RealAudio file ---> howdotheydoit.rm

chorus
how (hold) do they do it, how do they do it,
how do they do it, how do they do it
how do they do it
how do they dance so hard?
oh they dance in the street out in front of my yard
how do they do it
how can they dance so long
it's five whole days and they're still going strong
how do they do it, how do they do it,
how do they do it, how do

Well listen up to what I've got to say
there's a big bunch of dancers heading your way
bells and sticks and funny hats
they got baldrics and vests and stuff like that
flutes and melodeons and guitars too,  and then wait 'til you see what they do for you

chorus

well they dance in the bars and they dance in the parks
dance from the morning 'til way after dark
dance in the markets and they dance in the schools
day care centers and swimming pools
retirement communities and nursing homes
they just got to dance, they just got to roam

chorus

When you get to Cayutaville, you come on in
they got a pond out back if you want to swim
and they're singing the songs up beside the fire
that's the place to be if you wanna get higher
the camp sites just out behind the fence
and there's a whole lot of people, they are really (in tents/intense)

chorus

they got a contra dance to make you feel so fine
they got barrels of whiskey and bottles of wine
a fine selection of domestic beers, food you can eat 'til it comes out your ears
and to pay for all of them busses and trucks
you get five whole days for just thirty bucks

chorus
(ending with)
how do they do it, how do they do it,
how do they do it, how do they do it,
how do they do it, how do they do it,
how do

************************************************************************
Lads A Bunchum
[from Morris On, John Kirkpatrick et al.,
via Art Kaufmann (afk@tdat.elsegundoca.ncd.com)]

Oh, dear mother what a fool I've been,
Six young fellows came a courting me.
Five were blind and the other couldn't see,
Oh, dear mother, what a fool I've been.

or how Mianus and others sing it

Oh, dear mother what a fool I be,
Six young fellows came a courting me.
Five were blind and the other couldn't see,
Oh, dear mother, what a fool I be.

************************************************************************
Let Union Be in All Our Hearts

Come on, lads, and let's be jolly
Drive away all melancholy,
For, to grieve it would be folly,
While we are together.

 Let union be in all our hearts,
 Let all our hearts be joined as one.
 We'll end the day as we begun,
 We'll end it all in pleasure.

 Right-folla-rolla-rolla, too-ra-lie-o (3x)
 While we are together.

Old King Solomon, in all his glory,
Told each wife a different story,
Of the things that we delight in,
While we are together.

Eating and drinking are quite charming,
  (or: courting and drinking)
Smoking and piping there's no harm in.
  (or: piping and dancing)
These are things we take delight in,
While we are together.

Grab the bottle as it passes,
Do not fail to fill your glasses.
(or:  Come on, lads, and raise your glasses
        Grab the bottle as it passes)
Water drinkers are dull asses,
While we are together.

Cease your quarreling and fighting,
Evil thinking and backbiting.
All these things take no delight in,
While we are together.

It was originally a grange song and the original chorus was:
Let union be in all our farms,
Let all our farms be joined as one.

From the Digital Tradition 2.0,  given by Maddy De Leon and Mark Gilston, who learned it from Jim Mageean. (revised by John L)

When We're Met Together

Come my lads, let us be jolly,
Drive away old melancholy.
To be sad, it would be folly,
When we're met together.

Chorus: Let union be in all our hearts,
            Let union join our hearts in one;
            We'll end the day as we've begun,
            We'll end it all in pleasure!
            Right fole role rol, too rah lie-o,
            Right fole role rol, too rah lie-o,
            Right fole role rol, too rah lie-o,
            When we're met together.

Fill the board; let there be plenty
The man that wants to be content,
He eats and drinks enough for twenty
When we're met together.

Solomon, a wise man hoary,
Told of wine in song and story.
In our drink we'll chirp and glory
When we're met together.

Take the bottle as it passes;
Do not fail to fill your glasses.
Water drinkers are dull asses
When they're met together.
 

S&M version

While We're All In Leather (parody of "Let Union Be In All Our Hearts" )
From Nick Robertshaw (bignick@CLARK.NET)

Let bondage be in all our arts
Let both our wrists be joined as one
We'll end the day as we begun
End it all in leather

CHO: *** Whack *** folly rolly rolly rolly, too ra lido
           (flagellate here)

Soon the lady with the whip'll
Show you how the metal clip'll
Fix the chain onto your nipple
While we're all in leather

Dungeon basements, Gothic lighting
Piercing, cutting, searing, biting
These are things that we delight in
While we are in leather

For a pleasure like no other
Pretend your partner is your mother
All dressed up in latex rubber
While...

Though you think so long you've waited
Before your hunger can be sated
You must be humiliated
While...

You will find it so appealing
When you hear your partner squealing
Hung by flesh-hooks from the ceiling
While we are in leather.

Addendum
From William L. Brown (wmlbrown@earthlink.net)

Crack the bull whip as he passes
Wield your paddle 'til he gnashes
Leave your subjects with dull asses
While we are in leather

************************************************************************
Lollipop Man
[from Julia (j_schu.uminn1.bitnet)]

Oh, the lollipop man has a great big stick,
And he only charges a penny a lick.
He puts it away whenever [wherever] he can,
He's a dirty old bugger! He's the lollipop man.
 

From Carl Zwanzig <zbang@radix.net>
The White Rats Morris version of Lollipop Man

Oh, the lollipop man has a moderate sized stick,
And he never gives an unsanitary lick,
He always brushes his teeth when ever he can,
He's a fine upstanding citizen, the lollipop man.
--Kayta Barrows c 1998
 

and from the MDDL:
Date:    Mon, 21 Dec 1998
From:    Paul Woods <paul.woods@BRISTOL.AC.UK>
Subject: Lollipop Man

Rich Holmes said:

        As I first heard it, I'm not sure where (some northeastern USA
        morris team):

        Oh, the lollipop man has a great big stick
         And he only charges a penny a lick
        And he takes it out whenever he can
        He's a dirty old bugger, he's the lollipop man

and then asked:

        Is this a parody of another version?
 

Nope, but it's a fairly close copy.  As I revealed a few years back on
the MDDL the words to Lollipop man are a Bristol Morris Men invention.
I was actually in the car when they were invented!  It was, I think,
1977 or 78, and we were returning from an event either run by
Ravensbourne or the Martletts, I forget which.  The principal author of
the ditty was Adrian Shaw, the multi-creator of Bristol Morris Men's
Horse; and I myself contributed about 5 percent. The words were
exactly as Rich stated, except for line three which was:

"And he always gets it when he can"

Sorry to disappoint anyone, but we had no thoughts of pederasty in
writing the song, just thought it was a harmless bit of smut; and we
started to sing it in performances, particularly when there were
pompous fuddy-duddies around to be annoyed.

It caught on pretty quickly.  After just a few months we were at a
Mendip MM Ale, and another (fairly local) side got up to do Lollipop
Man. They all turned to each other, smirking and winking, and said
"Shall we sing the song then, lads?". It was obviously new to them,
and they were quite mortified when all the Bristol Men started singing
along with them - even more so when we told them it was "our" song.

And within a year of its invention Roy Dommett told us that he had
heard it sung by a side in the States.  Catchy enough to have been a
Eurovision Song Contest entry, I suspect...

Paul Woods,
BMM

And from John Maher (4/6/99)
>The persons in the Saab 95,  riding down the M(?) returning from
>the Ravensbourne Ring meeting when it was composed were me
>(driver), Adrian Shaw (main author), Paul Woods,  and (I think)
>Grant Glanville my brother-in-law.

<>************************************************************************
LORD OF THE DANCE
(See also Bored of the Dance, sung at the 1989 5 Day Wonder by Christine Gaca)

from Malcolm Austen <mausten@crl.co.uk>

I joined the Morris at an advanced age
And I wondered why our squire was always in a rage
These were the words that to me he said
He emphasised them with his stick on the crown of my head

CHORUS
Dance, dance when I give the word
Never mind the people who say we look absurd
Face the top and stand in line
Don't move a muscle 'til I say "This time"

Around the pubs we commenced to roam
The bagman left his wallet at home
The melodeon player was pissed and the piper's next door neighbour
Had run off with his wife and stolen his tabor

We danced at the Crown at half past eight
The fool was emasculated trying to jump the gate
The foreman said to me "I think we're out of luck"
Then his baldrics were caught by a passing Watneys truck

The collecting box went round and round
Till some clumsy bugger dropped it on the ground
"Christ" said the bagman "I think it's broken"
But all we had in it was a fruit machine token

It was late when at the Bull we did appear
It's hard to dance with a belly full of beer
"Follow me" said the squire "I'll show you the way"
Did we ever make a cock-up of that "Adderbury Hey"

At the end of the tour we were on our knees
But we'd danced for the people and done our best to please
My legs were aching and my feet were sore
I'm never going out with the Morris any more

Dave Houlden
Tune: Lord Of The Dance

<>******************************************************
Maid of the Mill
[from Don Ulin (ulind@ucs.indiana.edu)]

There's fifty fair maidens, that sports on the green,
I gar'd on them, well as you see.
But the Maid of the Mill, the Maid of the Mill,
The Maid of the Mill for me.
She is straight and tall as a poplar tree,
Her cheeks are red as a rose,
She is one of the fairest young girls I see,
When she's dressed in her Sunday clothes.
The Maid of the Mill, the Maid of the Mill,
The Maid of the Mill for me

From: "Jonno B" <plonker@dialstart.net>
Maid of the Mill - Bampton

The Maid of the Mill,
The Maid of the Mill,
She's alright,
cos she's on the pill.

The Maid of the Mill,
The Maid of the Mill,
Some say she won't,
but I know she will.

************************************************************************
The Morris Dance
(see John L for additional controversy)
[by Alice E.Gillington, from Steve Tunnicliff (Rutland Morris Men) Tunni@AOL.COM]

My new shoon they are so good,
I would dance Morris if I could;
And if hat and sark be drest,
I will dance Morris with the best!
Dancing Morris o'er brake and briar,
Round and round the Midsummer fire,
Follow, my heart, as the pipers go,
For ever, while the green rushes blow!

In rushen hat and rose-sprigged gown,
I would dance Morris adown the town;
In Godmother's kirtle of gridalin,
I would dance Morris till the e'en!
Dancing Morris o'er fell and dale,
From noontide heat till moonrise pale,
Follow, my heart, as the pipers go,
For ever, while the green rushes blow!

Wearing my gown of watchet blue,
I would dance Morris the green lanes through!
'Tis I would follow the pipers sweet,
With dancing steps adown the street!
Dancing Morris around the byre,
Over the moss, the moat, the mire,
Follow, my heart, as the pipers go,
For ever, while the green rushes blow!

My sark it is as pearly-white
As daisies of Midsummer night!
In Godmother's philemot cloak and hood,
I'll follow the pipers thro' the wood!
I will dance the Morris the whole day long
Till bells ring out for evensong;
Follow my heart as the pipers go,
For ever, while the green rushes blow!

[from The Treasury, Vol III April-Sept. 1904, edited by Anthony Dean; London G.J.Palmer & Sons, Portugal Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, W.C., p.186.]

************************************************************************
Nutting Girl
[from "Morris On", John Kirkpatrick, Richard Thompson, Barry Dransfield, Ashley Hutchings, Dave Matticks: Hannibal records HNCD4406;
via Art Kaufmann (afk@tdat.elsegundoca.ncr.com)] (line in parenthesis added by JL)

Now come all you jovial fellows,
Come listen to me song.
It is a little ditty,
And it won't detain you long.
It's of a fair young damsel.
Oh, she lived down in Kent,
Arose one summer's morning,
And she a-nutting went.
 With my fal-lal to me ral-tal-lal,
 Whack fol the dir-ol day.
 And what few nuts that poor girl had,
 She threw them all away.

Now it's of a brisk young farmer,
Who's a-plowing of his land.
He called unto his horses,
To bid them gently stand.
As he sat on his plough
All for a song to sing
His voice was so melodeous,
It made the valleys ring.
 With my fal-lal to me ral-tal-lal,
 Whack fol the dir-ol day.
 And what few nuts that poor girl had,
 She threw them all away.

Now it's of this brisk young damsel,
Who's nutting in the wood,
His voice was so melodeous,
It charmed her where she stood.
(In that lonely wood?) or (She did not have the power - offered by Neil Jennings)
She could no longer stay,
And what few nuts
She had, poor girl
She threw them all away.
 With my fal-lal to me ral-tal-lal,
 Whack fol the dir-ol day.
 And what few nuts that poor girl had,
 She threw them all away.

Well, she came up to young Johnny,
As he sat on his plough,
Said she, Young man, I really feel,
I cannot tell you how
So he took her to some shady broome,
And there he laid her down
Said she, Young man, I think I feel
The world go round and round.
 With my fal-lal to me ral-tal-lal,
 Whack fol the dir-ol day.
 And what few nuts that poor girl had,
 She threw them all away.

So, come all you local women,
This warning by me take,
Oh, if you should a nutting go
Don't stay out too late.
For if you should stay out too late
For to hear that ploughboy sing
You might have a young farmer
To nurse up in the spring.
 With my fal-lal to me ral-tal-lal,
 Whack fol the dir-ol day.
 And what few nuts that poor girl had,
 She threw them all away.

And another version from the Digital Tradition with slightly different language and an additional verse.

Now come all you jovial fellows,
come listen to my song
It is a little ditty
and it won't detail you long
It's of a fair young damsel,
and she lived down in Kent
Arose one summer's morning,
and she a-nutting went

CHO: With my fal-lal to my ral-tal-lal
          Whack-fol-the-dear-ol-day
          And what few nuts that poor girl had
          She threw them all away.

It's of a brisk young farmer,
was ploughing of his land
He called unto his horses,
to bid them gently stand
As he sit down upon his plough,
all for a song to sing
His voice was so melodious,
it made the valleys ring

It's of this fair young damsel,
she was nutting in the wood
His voice was so melodious,
it charmed her as she stood
In that lonely wood,
she could no longer stay
And what few nuts she had, poor girl,
she threw them all away

She then came to young Johnny,
as he sat upon his plough
She said:  ``Young man I really feel
I cannot tell you how''
So he took her to some shady broom,
and there he laid her down
Said she: ``Young man, I think I feel
the world go round and round''

He went back to his horses
to finish off his song
He said: ``My pretty fair maid,
your mother will think you long''
But she flung her arms all round his neck
as they went o'er the plain
And she said: ``My dear, I should like to see
the world go round again''

Now, come all you young women,
take warning by my song
If you should a-nutting go,
don't stay from home too long
For if you should stay too late,
to hear the ploughboy sing
You might have a young farmer
to nurse up in the spring

alt last verse (heard at a Five Day Wonder)

So, come all ye local women,
This warning by me take,
For if you should a nutting go,
Your diaphragm to take...

Nutting Girl
[unknown origin; sung as a tag at the end of the A part]

A-nutting we will go, me boys,
A-nutting we will go.
We'll put a garland in our hats
And give the girls a show.

************************************************************************
Old Bones
(from 5 Day Wonder, 1987)
(c) 1987 by Jim Blake. All rights reserved. From Jim: "Feel free to perform this,
but if you make a lot of money from it, I will want my cut." james.blake@ensco.com

Hear it sung by Jim himself. a RealAudio file ---> oldbones.rm

chorus
where are the ones who taught me the dance, who made me a part of the team
what would they say if they saw me now, wanting to carry on, not certain how,
preparing a final caper and bow
at least sometimes that's how it seems
what has become of my team

looking back now over such a long time
I hardly remember before
it seems I've been dancing the whole of my life,
or maybe just a little while, sometimes I'm not sure
they led me like a child (it was great)
with a song and a word and a beautiful smile
but now they don't lead anymore

chorus

the moment I took up the offer to dance
they eagerly welcomed me in
my life was a shambles in need of repair
I'd spent my time losing and I needed a win
there's only so much you can stand
you know, and I was feeling too old to be such a young man
they gave me my youth back again

chorus
but where are the ones...

now I'm getting older and time takes it's toll
and I barely can get up at dawn
and I can't play the music and I fall out of step
my joints are all aching and my energy's gone
and I need a change in my life
maybe time in my home or time with my wife
it's time I was moving along

chorus
and where are the ones...

************************************************************
Old Dun Cow

Some friends and I in a public house
were playing dominoes one night
when all of a sudden in the potman ran
his face was all a'fright
What's up Brown? Have you seen a ghost?
Have you seen your aunt Mariah?
Well me aunt Mariah be buggered says he
The bleedin pub's on fire!

On fire, says Brown, what a bit o luck
come along with me shouts he
for down in the cellar if the fire ain't there
we'll have a grand/rare old spree
So we all went down 'long with good old Brown
for that booze we could not miss
and we hadn't been 10 minutes there
before we all got pissed

(chorus)
And there was Brown, upside down
lickin' up the whiskey off the floor
Booze! Booze! the fireman cried
as they came knockin at the door
don't let 'em in until it's all mopped up
Someone shouted MACINTYRE!
so we all got blue-blind-paralytic drunk
when the old dun cow caught fire

Old Johnson flew to the port wine tub
and he gave it just a few hard knocks
he then starts taking off his pantaloons
likewise his boots and socks
Hold hard said Snooks, if you want to wash your feet
There's a barrel full of four ale here
Don't go putting your trotters in the port wine Jack
when we've got some old stale beer

(chorus)

All of a sudden came an awful crash
half the bloody roof gave way
we got drowned by a fireman's hose
but still we were all gay (almost... happy)
for we found some sacks and some old tin tacks
and we bunged ourselves inside
and we got drinking that good ole Scotch
till we were bleary eyed

(chorus)

we got so drunk that we did not know
the blooming cellar caught fire
poor old Jones had the DTs bad
and wanted to retire
there's old Nick said another poor chap
and he's poking up the bleeding fire
that is no boogy, its a fireman, Tom
at least said Macintyre

Let's get out, said a blind eye'd boy
it's getting rather hot down here
don't be a fool, said a boozy bloke
we haven't drank the beer
so we filled our hats and we drank like cats
amidst the flames and smoke
I had to take my trousers off
for I thought that I should croak

(Spoken)
at last the fireman got inside
and found us all dead drunk
but like all true heroes, there they stood
they did not do a bunk
they saw the booze upon the floor
and gave a sudden yell
they took their helmets off and then
upon their knees they fell
at last! at last! the firemen cried
at last we know the news
come on, come on, us lads all cried
come on and have a booze
 

*************************************************************************
Old Molly Oxford (Stepback)
[from Clyde F. O'Neal, II (coneal@isdmnl.wr.usgs.gov),  words co-written by Jon Berger (jonb@value.net) and Dennis Carney]

Old Molly Oxford slept on a featherbed,
The cat jumped up and fell asleep on her head,
Smothered her until she was dead,
Poor old Molly Oxford

************************************************************************
Old Rose and Crown (from The Digital Tradition)
(Ian Robb)

chorus:
     What have they done to the old Rose and Crown?
     The Ship, the King's Arms, and the World Upside Down.
     For oak, brass, and leather, and a pint of the best
     Fade away like the sun as it sinks in the west.

Good friends, gather round and I'll tell you a tale.
It's a story well known to all lovers of ale.
The old English pub, once a man's second home
Has been decked out by brewers in plastic and foam.

And the old oaken bar where the pumps filled your glass
Gives way to Formica and tanks full of gas.
And the landlord behind, once a man of good cheer
Just mumbles the price as he hands you your beer.

And where are the friends who would meet for a jar,
Or a good game of darts in the old public bar?
The dartboard is gone, in its place is a thing
Where you pull on the handle and lose all your tin.

But the worst of it all's what they've done to the beer.
For their shandies and lagers that will make you feel queer.
For an arm and a leg, they will fill up your glass
With a half and half mixture of ullage and gas.

Recorded on Rose and Crown, Robb (Folk-Legacy)
Copyright Ian Robb

************************************************************************

Old Time Religion
see also a web page with more words

[From Don Ulin (ULIND@UCS.INDIANA.EDU)

1) Let us worship Aphrodite,
Though we hear she's rather flighty
Still she looks great in a nightie
And that's good enough for me.

2) We will pray to Father Zeus
In his temple we'll hang loose
Eating roast beef au jus,
And that's good enough for me.

3) Let us worship like the Druids
Drinking strange fermented fluids
Running naked through the wo-ods,
And that's good enough for me.
[Alternative third line: Running naked but for wo-ads]

4) My roommate worships Buddha.
There is no idol cuter.
Comes in copper, bronze, and pewter,
And that's good enough for me.

5) We will worship Sun Myung Moon
Though we know he is a goon.
All our money he'll have soon.
And that's good enough for me.

6) We will go down to the temple,
Sit on mats woven of hemp(le),
Try to set a good exemple [sic],
And that's good enough for me.

7) We will finally pray to Jesus,
From our sins we hope he frees us,
Eternal life he guarantees us,
And that's good enough for me.

8) Let us pray to Zarathustra
Let us pray just like we useta
I'm a Zarathustra boosta
It's good enough for me.

9) Let us pray like the Egyptians
Build pyramids to put our crypts in
Fill our subways with inscriptions
It's good enough for me.

10) If it's good enough for Dagon
That conservative old pagan
Who still votes for Ronald Reagan
It's good enough for me

11) We will have a mighty orgy,
In the honor of Astarte
It will be one helluva party
And it's good enough for me.

12) We will sacrifice to Yuggoth
Carve the signs of Azag-Thoth
Burn a candle for Yog-Sothoth
And the Goat with a thousand young.

13) We will all be saved by Mithras
We will all be saved by Mithras
Slay the bull and play the zithras
On that resurrection day.

14) We will all bow down to Enlil
We will all bow down to Enlil
Pass your cup and get a refill
With bold Gilgamesh the brave.

15) It was good enough for Loki
It was good enough for Loki
He thinks Thor's a little hokey
And he's good enough for me.

16) We will all go to Nirvana
So be sure to mind your manners
Make a left turn at Savannah
And we'll see the Promised Land.

17) It was good for old Jehova
He had a son who was a nova
Hey there, Mithras move on ova'
A new resurrection day.

18) Where's the gong gang? I can't find it
I think Northwoods is behind it
For they've always been cymbal minded
Yet they're good enough for me.

19) I hear Valkyries a-comin
In the air their song is coming
They forgot the words they're humming
Yet they're good enough for me.

20) There are people into voodoo
Africa has raised a whoodo
Just one little doll will do you
And it's good enough for me.

21) It was good for Thor and Odin
Grab an axe and get your woad on
Till the Giants went and rode in
And it's good enough for me.

21a)It was good enough for Odin
Though the croakin' was forbodin'
Until the giants road in
And it's good enough for me

22) If your rising sign is Aries
You'll be taken by the faeries
Meet the Buddha in Benares
Where he'll hit you with a pie.

23) There will be a lot of lovin'
When we're gathered in our coven.
Quit your pushin' and your shovin'
So there'll be room enough for me.

24) There are followers of Conan.
And you'll never hear 'em groaning
Followed Crom up to his throne(in)
And it's good enough for me

25) It could be that you're a Parsi.
It could be that you're a Parsi.
Walk on by her; you'll get in free
And you're good enough for me.

26) Azathoth is in his Chaos.
Azathoth is in his Chaos.
Now if only he don't sway us,
Then that's good enough for me.

27) Just like Carlos Casteneda,
Just like Carlos Casteneda,
It'll get you sooner or later
And it's good enough for me.

28) We will venerate Bubastes.
We will venerate Bubastes.
If you like us then just ask us,
And that's good enough for me.

29) We will all sing Hari Krishna.
We will all sing Hari Krishna.
It's not mentioned in the mishna
But that's good enough for me.

30) We will read from the Cabala.
Quote the Tree of Life mandala
It won't get you in Valhalla,
Yet it's good enough for me.

31) If you think that you'll be sa-ved,
If you think that you'll be sa-ved,
If you follow Mogan David,
You're not good enough for me.

32) It's the opera written for us.
We will all join in the chorus.
It's the opera about Boris
Which is Godunov for me.

33) There is room enough in Hades
For lots of criminals and shadies
And disreputable ladies,
And they're good enough for me.

34) To the tune of Handel's "Largo"
We will hymn the gods of cargo
'Til they slap on an embargo
And that's good enough for me.

35) Praise to Popacatapetl
Just a tiny cigarette'll
put him in terrific fettle
so he's good enough for me.

36) We will drive up to Valhalla
riding Beetles, not Impalas
singing "Deutschland Uber Alles"
and that's good enough for me.

37) We will all bow to Hephaestus
As a blacksmith he will test us
'cause his balls are pure asbestos
so he's good enough for me.

38) We will sing of Iluvatur,
Who sent the Valar 'cross the water
To lead Morgoth to the slaughter
And that's just fine with me.

39) We will sing of Foul the Render,
Who's got Drool Rockworm on a bender
In his cave in Kiril Threndor--
They're both too much for me.

40) We will sing the Jug of Issek,
And of Fafhrd his chief mystic,
Though to thieving Mouser will stick,
And that's good enough for me.

41) Of Lord Shardik you must beware;
To please him you must swear;
'Cause enraged he's a real Bear,
And that's good enough for me.

42) You can dance and wave the thyrsos
And sing lots of rowdy verses
Till the neighbors holler curses,
And that's good enough for me.

43) Let us celebrate Jehovah
Who created us \ab/ \ova/
He'll be on tonight on Nova
'cause he's good enough for me.

44) Montezuma used to start out
He would rip a certain part out
You would really eat your heart out
And he's good enough for me.

45) We will go to worship Zeus
Though his morals are quite loose
He gave Leda quite a goose
And he's good enough for me.

46) It was good enough for Loki
For he is the god of Chaos
And this verse doesn't even rhyme, or scan. Fuck you! It's good enough for me.

47) Let us sing to old Discordia
'Cause it's sure she's never bored ya
And if she's good enough for ya
Then she's good enough for me.

48) We will go to worship Venus
Though we hear she's kind of mean(us)
She might bite you on the--elbow
But she's good enough for me.

49) Well, we went to worship Venus
And, by god, you should have seen us
'Cause the clinic had to screen us
But she's good enough for me.

50) We will go and worship Isis
She will help us in a crisis
And she'll never raise her prices
So she's good enough for me.

51) We will sing a song of Mithras
Let us sing a song of Mithras
But there is no rhyme for Mithras!
Still he's good enough for me.

52) We will go to worship Kali
She will help us in our folly
She'd be quite an armful, golly!
And she's good enough for me.

53) We will all bow down to Allah,
For he gave his loyal follow-
Ers the mighy petro-dollah,
And that's good enough for me.

54) Let us sing to Lord Cthuhlu
Don't let Lovecraft try to fool you
Or the Elder Gods WILL rule you
And that's good enough for me.

55) Let us watch Ka.ka.pa.ull
Frolic in her swimming pool
Subjecting chaos to her rule
And that's all right with me

56) Let's all listen up to Jesus
He says rich folks like old Croesus
Will be damned until Hell freezes
And that don't sound good to me.

57) Let us do our thing for Eris
Goddess of the discord there is
Apple's golden, it's not ferrous
and that's good enough for me

58) Of the Old Ones, none is vaster
Even Cthulhu's not his master
I refer to the unspeakable ------*
and that's good enough for me

* well, do YOU want to say it?

59) Let us worship old Jehovah
All you other gods move ovah
Cause the one God's takin' over
And it's good enough for me

60) Let us sing for Brooharia
Though the blood's a lot less cleaner
It's not Christian Santaria
So it's good enough for me

61) Timmy Leary we will sing to
And the things that he was into
(Well, at least it wasn't Shinto)
And that's good enough for me.

62) We shall sacrifice to OTIS
and Lotus, Spode, and Rotus
Though the normals may not notice
It will be good enough for me.

63) Then we'll worship with the Fruitcakes
(better than those Buddhist flakes)
bowing for the weekly keepsake
and it will be good enough for me

64) Let us all pray to Bacchus
'Cause he's really wild and raucous.
He will lay us down and faucous [sic]
And it's good enough for me.

From: Ken delPo <orso_kdp@yahoo.com> I learned this from a friend who went to the Harvard Divinity School, and is now a minister somewhere.

65) Let us worship like the Quakers
...
...
And it's good enough for me

from Mark Elliott" <mark@takkybooks.com> and that's not to mention the "Jim & Tammy Faye" variants

66) Let us sing a praise to Loki
The Norse God of Fire and Chaos
Which is why this verse doesn't rhyme or scan
But it's good enough for me
 

Verses 1-7 (omitting 1a) were submitted ( and possibly written by) Dan Ruvin. Verses 8 and 9 submitted by John Redford
Verse 10 submitted by John "Out of tune again" Wenn Music
Verses 11-33 were submitted by Judith Schrier taken from Filthy Pierre's Song Book.
Verses 34-38 and 45 submitted by Chip Hitchcock
Verses 39-42 submitted by Will Duquette
Verses 43-44 submitted by Ruth Sylvester
Verses 46-54 submitted by Erich Rickheit KSC
Verses 55-60 submitted by Dani Zweig
Verse 61 submitted by Erich Rickheit KSC
Verse 62-63 by EJ Barnes, submitted by Tim Howland, member in moderately good standing of the Intergalactic House of Fruitcakes.

************************************************************************
Old Woman Tossed Up
[from Geo Kloppel (geok@aol.com)]

There was an old woman tossed up in a blanket
Ninety-nine miles beyond the moon.
Under one arm she carried a basket
And under the other she carried a broom.

Old woman, old woman, old woman, says I,
Oh whither, oh whither, oh whither so high?
I'm going to sweep cobwebs from out of the sky,
And I'll be back with you by and by.

************************************************************************
Padstow May Day Song
[from John Quinn (john_quinn@classics.baylor.edu) with an update from Steve Griffiths]

Unite and unite and let us all unite
for summer is a-come in today
And whither we are going we all will unite
in the merry morning of May.

With the merry ring, and now the joyful spring,
Give to us a cup of ale and the merrier we shall sing.

The young men of Padstow they might if they would,
they might have built a ship and gilded it with gold.
The young women of Padstow they might if they would,
they might have made a garland with the white rose and the red.*

Where are those young men that now here should dance?
Some they are in England and some they are in France.

O, where is St. George,* o, where is he, o ?
He's out in his long boat all on the salt seas, o.
Up flies the kite, down falls the lark, o,
Aunt Ursula Birdhood,* she had an old yowe,*
and she died in her own park (parc*), o.

With the merry ring, and now the joyful spring,
how happy is the little bird that merrily doth sing.

*  white rose and the red = the symbol of England since the time of Henry VII; also, red and white are the colors associated with St. George.  The men who
accompany the Oss on his morning revels wear red shirts and white pants.

* St. George = the patron saint of England, since the time of Richard the Lion-Hearted.  His holiday is April 23, just one week before May Day.  The people of Padstow believe that St. George once visited their land, and that his horseÕs hooves created the well outside of town, in which they are baptised.

* Aunt Ursula Birdhood = (ultimately) St. Ursula, a nun from Cornwall who was martyred in Germany by Attila the Hun; she is often mentioned in Cornish songs with reverence, unlike here.

* yowe = ewe

* parc - From: "Steve Griffiths" <steve.griffiths@st-annes.oxford.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002
"The last line to the 'Oh where is St George' oft repeated chorus when the 'Obby Oss' apparently dies (before being broughtback to life), makes more sense if the work park is spelt parc. In the old Cornish language 'parc' means garden. I have seen several versions where this Cornish word is used.

************************************************************************
The Phantom Flasher (A parody of the Keeper)
From the singing of Jim Blake at the Five Day Wonder, 1986
(Hear it!. Clickon the RealAudio file "35.rm".)
 

(Well, dirty Mack?) an evil grin
He walks the streets of old Wiggin
The police would like a word with him
He is the Phantom Flasher

Chorus
Is he here? Don't know.
Could he be? Probably.
I think I see him standing next to you.
He is the phantom flasher
With a hey down down, with a hoe down down
Hey down, hoe down, has he got em down? (all)
He is the phantom flasher.

One day he flashed the widow Brown
She went and bought a wedding gown.
Now she chases him all through the town
He is the phantom flasher

Chorus

One day he flashed me in the park
With my spray can I made my mark.
Now he floresces in the dark.
He is the phantom flasher

Chorus
 
 

from Leigh Ann Hussey <leighann@sybase.com>

The Flasher went to the woods so tall,
and 'neath his coat wore nothing at all,
for to flash at the girlies small
Among the leaves so green-o.

Jackie boy?
Master!
Hung ye well?
Very well!
Hey down, ho down, derry derry down....
 
 

From Carl Zwanzig <zbang@radix.net>
The Keeper

The version that Leigh Ann Hussey presents (which she got from me...)
actually was written in 1979 at a Philadelphia house known as "Madhouse
Manor" by some drunk, but highly literate, SCA people. They also
produced a songbook. The full song is:

The keeper he was thin and tall
And under his coat wore naught at all
All for to flash at the girlies small
Among the leaves so green-o

ch

The first girl that he flashed turned bright red
        (The first he flashed, she turned bright red)- my version
The second one turned away her head,
        (The second turned away her head,)
"Not half bad" the third one said

ch

Now, here's the end of the keeper's tail
The coppers hauled him off to jail
He'll get out when he makes his bail
Among the woods so green-o

ch

Words copyright (c) 1979 James D MacDonald

************************************************************************
Pleasant and Delightful

It was pleasant and delightful one midsummer's morn
when the fields and the meadows we all covered with corn
and the blackbirds and thrushes sang on every green spray
and the larks, they sang melodious at the dawning of the day
And the larks, they sang melodious
And the larks, they sang melodious
And the larks, they sang melodious at the dawning of the day

A sailor and his true love were a' walking one day
Said the sailor to his true love, I am bound far away
I am bound for the East Indies, where the loud cannons roar
I must go and leave my Nancy, she's the girl that I adore
(Repeat)

Then the ring from off her finger she instantly drew
saying take this, my dearest William and my heart will go too
And whilst he stood embracing her, tears from her eyes fell
Saying may I go along with you, oh no alas, farewell
(Repeat)

So it's fair thee well my Nancy, I can no longer stay
For the topsail is hoisted and our anchor is weighed
And the ship lies awaiting for the next flowing tide
And if ever I return again, I will make you my bride
(Repeat)

************************************************************************
Postman's Knock - Adderbury
From: "Jonno B" <plonker@dialstart.net>

Every morning as true as a clock
Somebody hears the Postman's knock

(repeated twice)

************************************************************************
Princess Royal (Newtowne version)
[from Peter Masters (peter@icad.com)]

Oh, never smile at a crocodile,
Never tip your hat,
Or stop to talk a while.
Don't be taken in,
By his welcome grin.
He's imagining how good you'd be,
Within his skin

************************************************************************
Rigs o' Marlow (Headington)
from Rich Holmes (rsholmes@mailbox.syr.edu); from Sharp's Morris Book (vol. 1):Sharp gives some background on the history of the songs etc. which I won't transcribe here

The original is Rakes of Mallow:

Beauing, belling, dancing, drinking,
Breaking windows, damning, sinking,
Ever raking, never thinking,
Live the rakes of Mallow.

As sung at Headington:

When I go to Marlow Fair
With the ribbons in my hair
All the boys and girls declare
"Here come the rigs of Marlow"

As we learned it from Jim Blake:

When we go to Marlow Fair
Wearing ribbons in our hair
Everybody will declare
We are the rigs of Marlow.

*************************************************************************
Ring Your Bells Morris Men

Early in the weekend you can hear the squire shout
get up, ye Morris, We're going dancing out.
Why do they do it, they're crazy in the head
They'd rather ring their Morris bells, than have a roll in bed

Ring your bells Morris men
Foot up, hands round,
Back-to-back and chorus
Processional up and down
And when you do the whole hey
you do it with some class
'cause if you don't the bloody squire
will kick you in the bells

Out on the green, the valiant Morris stands
Feet are at the ready, the handkerchiefs in hand
Why are they waiting, the music sounds so clear?
They're waiting for the foreman to get finished with his beer

Now they are moving, the winster tune we hear,
The foreman's finally finished with his 32nd beer
The bells are brightly ringing, their lines are straight and true
The bagman's out of step but that's not anything that's new

The first dance is Black Joke and then it's Shepherd's Hey
Next is Constant Billy and the Twenty-Ninth of May
The Morris men are brave and true, they only have one fear
That they won't get enough in bag to keep the team in beer

Now the day is ended, the bells no longer sound
The evil spirits all have fled, the beans are in the ground
They drain their mugs of each last drop, their bodies to renew
They drink and dance, and dance and drink the whole season through
 

************************************************************************
Rise up, Jock (Pegg)
From the 1971 album "He Came From The Mountains" by Bob and Carole Pegg (before they became Mr Fox) Trailer LP number LER 3016

As I walked out one evening, To take the pleasant air The birds sang in the bushes, And the weather it was fair I sat for a while to rest my back, Against a shady oak When by there came a band of men, With faces black as smoke

And its rise up Jock and sing a song
For the summer is short and winter's long
Then all join hands and form a chain
While the leaves of springtime bloom again

Oh, the first one was a soldier, With a rifle in his hand He'd just returned from fighting wars, In many a distant land He'd left his regiment sleeping, At the foot of a foreign hill And he'd come back to old England, To kill and to be killed

Chorus

And the next one was a sailor, He'd just returned from sea He'd sailed the world for seven years, Before he was set free That evening as the sun went down, He anchored by the shore And he came back to old England, To fight one battle more

Chorus

In the middle of the forest, The blackbird it did sing As the soldier and the sailor, Took their place inside a ring And when the battle started, They went at it blow-by-blow When the battle ended, Down their backs the blood did flow

Chorus

Oh, the doctor and the chimney sweep, Came walking arm-in-arm And when they saw the bodies there, They showed no alarm For the doctor had been travelling, In Italy and Spain An he had in his bag a tiny flask, To ease any ache or pain

Chorus

Now he gave a drink to the soldier, Who was lying on the ground And he jumped up and sang a song, And passed the bottle round Then the sailor leapt up from the ground, As sure as he was born And the soldier, the sailor, the sweep and the doctor, Danced into the dawn

************************************************************************
Roast Beef of Old England (Adderbury)

Here's to the Roast Beef of Old England
Here's to Old England's Roast Beef

(repeat twice)

************************************************************************

Save Your Money While You're Young
found by Andrew White at a Digital Tradition mirror site.

Come all you jolly good fellows, I'll sing to you a song
It's all about them shanteyboys and it won't take me long
For it's now that I regret the day, while I'm working out
  in the cold
Save your money when you're young, me boys, you'll need it
   when you're old

For once I was a shantey boy, now wasn't I a lad?
And the way I spent me money, now wasn't it too bad?
But it's now that I regret the day, while I'm working
   out in the cold
Save your money when you're young, me boys, you'll need it
   when you're old

And if you are a married man, I'll tell you what to do
Just be good to you're wife and family, as you have
    sworn to do
Stay away from all grog shops where liquor is bought and sold
Save your money when you're young, me boys, you'll need it
   when you're old

And if you are a single man, I'll tell you what to do
Just find yourself some pretty young girl that to you will
   prove true
Just find yourself some pretty girl that is not over bold
That  will stick to you through life and be a comfort when
   you're old

For once I was a shanty boy, now wasn't I a lad?
And the way I spent me money, now wasn't it too bad?
But it's now that I regret the day, while I'm working
   out in the cold
Save your money when you're young, me boys, you'll need it
   when you're old

*********************************************************
Shepherd's Hey (Bucknell or Adderbury...)
[from (??) Cami Kaynor via Alan McArdle (amcardle@oirp.umass.edu)]

I can whistle, I can sing,
I can do most anything.
I can dance and I can play,
I can do the Shepherd's Hey.

[from M. C. Wright]

If you can't dance,
And you can't sing,
You can join the Morris Ring.
 

[from "Morris On",  John Kirkpatrick et al.,
via Art Kaufmann (afk@tdat.elsegundoca.ncr.com);
Mark Rogers (mr@cis.compulink.co.uk)]

I can whistle,
I can play.
I can dance the Shepherd's Hey.
 

[from Mark Rogers ((mr@cis.compulink.co.uk)]

I can dance and
I can sing
Bollocks to the Morris Ring
 

[from Rob Powell (rpowell@mv.us.adobe.com)]

I can puke,
I can spew,
I can drink more beer than you.

(Ducklington)

I can whistle
And I can play
And I can dance
The Shepherd's Hey
 

Shepherd's Away (adaptation of Shepherd's Hey)
[from Rich Holmes (rsholmes@mailbox.syr.edu)]

Shepherd's Hey, clover too,
Rye grass seeds and turnips too.
I can whistle, I can play,
I can dance the Shepherd's Away.
 

from Sandy Glover Sandy, St Albans Morris Men, sandyglover@writeme.com

I can whistle, I can play,
You can stuff your Shepherds Hey!

************************************************************************
South Australia (Adderbury)
([from Rich Holmes (rsholmes@mailbox.syr.edu)] Dance by an Australian team. These are the words as the Hounds sing them.)

In South Australia I was born
Heave away, haul away
In South Australia 'round Cape Horn
We're bound for South Australia

Haul away you rolling kings
Heave away, haul away
Haul away, we're bound to sing,
We're bound for South Australia
 

As sung by Bob DuPre:

In South Australia I was born
To me, heave away. To me haul away.
South Australia 'round Cape Horn
We're bound for South Australia

chorus:
Haul away, you rolling kings.
To me, heave away. To me, haul away.
Haul away you'll here me sing.
We're bound for South Australia.

As I roved out one morning fair...
T'was there I met Miss Nancy Blair...

I shook her up. I shook her down...
I shook her 'round and 'round and 'round...

I run 'er all night. I run 'er all day...
I run 'er until we sailed away...

There's only one thing grieves me mind...
To leave Miss Nancy Blair's behind...

As we did wallop 'round Cape Horn...
I wished to Christ I'd never been born...

I wish I was on Australia's strand...
A bottle of whiskey in me hand...
 

From:    David Barnes <barnesd@IBM.NET>
Subject: Re: Bound for South Australia
edited...
 

CAPSTAN
1.      In South Australia I was born, Heave away, haul away,
        In South Australia round Cape Horn, We're bound for South Australia.
Ch.     Heave away you rollikins, Heave away, haul away,
        Heave away you'll hear me sing, We're bound for South Australia.

BACK TO BACK
2.      As I walked out one morning fair, Heave away, haul away,
        'Twas there I met Miss Nancy Blair, We're bound for South Australia.
Ch.     Heave away you rollikins, Heave away, haul away,
        Heave away you'll hear me sing, We're bound for South Australia.

TOPS DOWN
3.      I shook her up I shook her down, Heave away, haul away,
        I shook her round and round the town, We're bound for South Australia.
Ch.     Heave away you rollikins, Heave away, haul away,
        Heave away you'll hear me sing, We're bound for South Australia.

BOTTOMS UP
4.      There ain't but one thing grieves me mind, Heave away, haul away,
        To leave Miss Nancy Blair behind, We're bound for South Australia.
Ch.     Heave away you rollikins, Heave away, haul away,
        Heave away you'll hear me sing, We're bound for South Australia.

HANDS AROUND
5.      And now we're sailing round Cape Horn, Heave away, haul away,
        You'll wish to God you'd never been born, We're bound for South Australia.
Ch.     Heave away you rollikins, Heave away, haul away,
        Heave away you'll hear me sing, We're bound for South Australia.

ADDERBURY HEY
6.      And now I'm safely on dry land, Heave away, haul away,
        With a bottle of whisky in me hand, We're bound for South Australia.
Ch.     Heave away you rollikins, Heave away, haul away,
        Heave away you'll hear me sing, We're bound for South Australia.
 

From Carl Zwanzig <zbang@radix.net>

In South Austrailia skylab fell...
Sixty million shot to hell...

Needless to say, the White Rats have their own version, too.

************************************************************************
Staines Morris
[from p. 126,  The Ballad Literature and Popular Music of the Olden Time, by William Chappel, 1859 (reprinted 1965)]

Come, ye young men, come along,
With your music, dance, and song,
Bring your lasses in your hands,
For tis that which love commands.
Then to the Maypole come away,
For it is now a holiday.

It is the choice time of the year,
For the violets now appear;
Now the rose receives its birth,
And pretty primrose decks the earth.
Then to the Maypole come away,
For it is now a holiday.

Here each batchelor may chuse
One that will not faith abuse;
Nor repay with coy disdain
Love that should be loved again.
Then to the Maypole come away,
For it is now a holiday.

And when you well reckoned have
What kisses you your sweethearts gave,
Take them all again, and more,
It will never make them poor.
Then to the Maypole come away,
For it is now a holiday.

When you thus have spent the time
Till the day be past its prime,
To your beds repair at night,
And dream there of your day's delight.
Then to the Maypole come away,
For it is now a holiday.
 

Stains Morris
[from Sean ("Washed, dried and folded") Smith, Middlesex Morris (SMTHSEN@HERMES.BC.EDU)

Come ye dancers, come along
With your boxers, briefs, and thongs
Add the bleach and set on "high"
For the sweat stains now are nigh

Then to the laundrette, haste away!
We must clean our unmentionables today

************************************************************************
Step and Fetch Her (aka Shave the Donkey)

Often known as:

Shave the doneky
Shave the donkey
Shave teh donkey
Pretty little thing

and sung as every or just the last chorus.

Date:    Sat, 1 Apr 2000
From:    Chris Bartram
Subject: Donkey Shaving

There are a large number of wordsets for 'The Triumph' aka 'Shave the
Donkey', 'Up the Sides and Down the Middle', 'Step and Fetch Her' ,' Sally
Luker', 'Pretty Little Dear' to mention just a few of the names that the
tune had 'in tradition'. The tune varied a lot around the country.

'Shave the Donkey' is a particularly idiosyncratic (and I think, probably quite recent) Bampton
set of the words, possibly coming from the many non-Bampton musicians who've played for the
sides over the years.  In the '60's, I remember the words 'step and fetch her, step and fetch her, pretty
little dear' being used.

and from Lee M.Thompson-Herbert

The Bampton dance inspired the local name, "Fetch a Stretcher."
After doing it once at an ale, it inspired me to start singing

Fetch a stretcher
Fetch a stretcher
Fetch a stretcher
I've broken my ankle

************************************************************************
Strike The Bell
[from Eddie Dunmore (edunmore@CIX.COMPULINK.CO.UK)]

Aft on the poop deck, walkin about,
There is the second mate, so steady an so stout;
What he is thinkin of he doesn't know himself,
O, we wish that he would hurry up and strike, strike the bell.

Chorus:
 Strike the bell, second mate ! Let us go below,
 Look well to windward, ye can see it's gonna blow,
 Look at the glass, ye will see it has fell,
 And we wish that you would hurry up and strike, strike the bell!

Down on the maindeck working at the pumps,
There is the larboard watch a-longing for their bunks;
Looking to windward they see a great swell,
They're wishing that the second mate would strike, strike the bell!

Chorus:

Aft at the wheel poor Anderson stands,
Grasping at the spokes wid his cold, mittened hands;
Looking at the compass, oh, the course is clear as hell,
He's wishing that the second mate would strike, strike the bell.

Chorus:

Forward on the (forcaslehead?) keeping sharp lookout,
There is Johnny standing, ready for to shout,
"Lights burning bright, sir, and everything is well !"
He's wishing that the second mate would strike, strike the bell.

Chorus:

Aft on the quarterdeck our gallant captain stands,
Looking to windward, his glasses in his hands;
What he is thinking of we know very well,
He's thinking more of shortening sail than strike, strike the bell !

Chorus:

************************************************************************
Sweet Jenny Jones
[from Rich Holmes (rsholmes@mailbox.syr.edu); from Tim Radford's book on Adderbury]

My sweet Jenny Jones is the pride of Llangollen
My sweet Jenny Jones is the girl I love best
(reapeat twice)

************************************************************************
Twelfth Night Song
[from Julia E. Schult (J-SCHU@UMINN1.BITNET)]

Joy, health love and peace
be all here in this place
by your leave, we will sing
concerning our king.

Our king is well dressed
in silks of the best
in ribbons so rare
no king can compare

We have traveled many miles
over hedges and (stiles?)
in search of our king
unto you we bring

We have powder and shot
to conquer the lot (basses: we have . . . )
we have cannon and ball(s)
to conquer them all)

Bold Christmas is passed
Twelfth Night is the last,
And we bid you adieu
Great joy to the new . . .
************************************************************************
Trunkles

Bledington from Will Quale
Ev - 'ry mornin' drink a little coffee
Ev - 'ry mornin' drink a little tea

From Keith Leech
We got this from the Men of Sweyns Ey in the early 70s, and I'm sure it goes back further than that.

Every morning take a sip of water
Every morning take a little pee

From John Price
The earliest version of this that I heard (Oxford University Morris
Men, 1962 - but I'm not claiming it was invented by OUMM) was something like:

Ev'ry morning make a little water
Ev'ry morning take a little pee

From Peter Klosky

The Binghamton Men sing...
"ev'ry morning, take a little water, / ev'ry morning, take a little tea."
...which we got from Michael Blanford in the early 70's.

NewTowne MM, in the late 70's had:
"Jump in the hot-tub, snort a little cocaine, / ev'rything is ev'rything."

From Tom Keays

Ev'ry morning sniff a little cocaine
Ev'ry morning take a little pee

I've heard the second couplet variation as
Sitting in the hot tub, do a little cocaine
Everything is everything
 

************************************************************************
When Jone's Ale Was New

There were 5 jovial fellows
came over the hill together
came over the hill together
to make up a jovial crew

chorus
and they ordered their pints of beer and bottles of sherry
to help them over the hills so merry
to help them over the hills so merry
when Jone's Ale was new me boys
when Jone's Ale was new

and the first to come in was a tinker
and he wasn't no small ale drinker
no he wasn't no small ale drinker
to make up the jovial crew
he called for a pint of the very best (?)
to drink a full gallon he never would ? (fathom?)
to drink a full gallon he never would ?
when Jone's ale was new me boys, etc

alt end of the first  verse from Jonathan Unna of Rutland MM <jrunna@globalnet.co.uk>

Have you any old pots or pans or kettles?
My rivets are of the very best metals
And I'll soon have them all in fine fettle
When Jones Ale etc

and the next to come in was a soldier
with a firelock over his shoulder
with a firelock over his shoulder
to make up the jovial crew
he said he would fight for king and crown
and knock each enemy rascal down
he called for pints of beer all around
when Jone's ale was new me boys, etc

and the next to come in was a dyer
and he sat himself down by the fire
for that was his desire
to make up the jovial crew
he told the (?) to her own face
the chimney corner was his own place
& there he would sit and dye his own (?)
when Jone's ale was new me boys, etc

the next to come in was a mason
and his hammer it needed refacin
his hammer it needed refacin
to make up the jovial crew
he threw his hammer against the wall
and wished that the church and chapel would fall
so there would be work for masons all
when Jone's ale was new me boys, etc

now the last to come in was a hatter
and no man could be fatter
to make up the jovial crew
when the landlady's daughter she came in
he kissed her betwixt the nose and the chin
and the pints of beer came rolling in
when Jone's ale was new me boys, etc
 

************************************************************************
Winster Processional (once to yourself)
[from Berkeley Morris, via Clyde F. O'Neal, II (coneal@isdmnl.wr.usgs.gov)]

This is it and that is it
And this is Morris dancing,
The piper fell and he broke his crown,
And wasn't that a chance, Sir?
 

Winster Wakes
[from Richard Howland-Bolton (reh1@cornell.edu)]

Winster Wakes there's ale and cakes
Allton Wakes there's trenchers
Birchouer Wakes there's knives and forks
Sheldon Wakes there's wenches

This is it and that is it
And this is a morris dance, sir
Me father fell and broke his leg
And so I took a chance, sir

I dunna know, you dunna know
What fun we had in Bampton
Piece of beef and an old cow's head
And pudding baked in a lantern

My new shoone they were so good
I could dance the morris if I would
And if in a hat and coat be dressed
I'll dance the morris with the best

Morris dance is a pretty tune
Lads and lasses plenty
Every lad shall have his lass
And I'll have four and twenty

A toast let's call to one and all
And new ones we're befriending
There's none so dear as them right here
And a song that's near to ending
 

***

Recordings of singing at Ales, 12th Nights and other places/events.

1983 12th Night (1/9/83), Daycroft School, Greenwich Guard, Round Hill Country Dancers and friends. Here is the program for this event. Front cover, pages 1&2, 3&4, 5&6, 7&8, back cover.

Listen to the whole performance!

(part 1) Andreus introduces, The Boar's Head (Paul, Elly), Andreus, Ryan, Dick Forsher, Emily, Dick calls a dance, Ryan and Andreus - King of the Bean, longsword dance (Andreus's Emily fiddling?), The Wassail Song (Paul, Roger, me, Elly?, Nelson?, Paul?), Sweet Jenny Jones (Paul calling), Black Joke Adderbury, lute 2 tunes (tape was a bit wobbly here.)

(part 2) Fried intros but doesn't call Nonesuch and Fandango, Fandango (mistake in the B music), rapper intro (Andreus, Tony, Greg, Chuck, Aaron, Ryan) & dance, Lord of the Dance - Jim Lucas leads (short edit for intermission), Prinderella - Judith (low level), Roger - Rev Prynne, Beaux of London City (Adderbury, Paul calling), Roger revives the musician, Flowers of Edinburgh, Andreus tries to recruit, Ed Potter calls a country dance, Daycroft announcements...

(it continues on to another performance?) Sussex carol (Paul leads with Elly), Andreus intros Fieldtown Nutting Girl jig, Fried? - Rufty Tufty, lute - 2 pieces, Mummers Play w/ Aron, Ryan, Elly as farmer, me as woman, Good Master and Good Mistress - Elly, Bonny Green and song


10/19/85 - Singing at my house after the Sherborne workshop,
(Good recording, good singing, good songs)

a side of tape
Some Millstone River Morris people,
Jim and Lindy Van Fleet, Roger Geach and Chris Levy stayed over at my house that night (pic of the next day, still singing) and we sang: Gimme That Old Time Religion, ? -Leather Wing Bat? -  Burl Ives, Mexican Hat Dance song, Lydia The Tatooed Lady, Every Propeller Is Turning/anti Soviet song - Roger, Clementine, Diesel and Shale, Betsy Go Home - Jim sings falsetto, Country Life w/ parody verses inc, Old Woman From Wexford  and then parody Old Lady From Venice (Beach CA, "tripping 'll make you crazy"), Glorious Ale - Jim (from the Clancy Brothers), Water Is Alright In Tay - Jim, Nutting Girl, Bells Have Turned Green, Down On Old Bum Knee, F Word Song (Peter & Lou Berryman), talk of Berrymans

b side of tape
Sportsmen Arise/Innocent Hare, talk of Berryman song - Like a Dog's Hair in a Jellybean - Chris.


1986 12th Night (1/18/86)
Round Hill Country Dancers, Ahlmat Recorder Ensemble, NY Irregular Mummers, Half Moon Sword, Greenwich Guard

listen to side a
* = Andreus
musical introduction: Tis a Gift to Be Simple, hymn, I Dream of Jeanie, *, Good King Wenceslas, * choosing of the king & queen (w/ accordion music), * Boar’s Head Carol & processional, * Round Hill Country Dancers: 1) Shrewsbury Lasses, 2) Newcastle, Ahlmat Recorder Ensemble: 1) Endless Night, 2) , 3) , 4)  Scottish folk song), 5) , 6) Daycroft person reads from the revels, * rowdy people outside, mummers play: w/ Ryan… Roger’s laugh)

listen to side b
mummers play cont, longsword entrance & dance (Papa Stour), Act 2: (missed up to) intro to Greenwich Guard sung by Ryan & rapper sword dance, * country dance - Black Joke w/ bells, * bows, Dick Forsher calls Chorus Jig, w/ Dancing Bear, another


1986 Five Day Wonder singing  
(Good recording, good singing, good songs)

Below are all the songs I recorded sitting around the campfire at 2 nights of the Five Day Wonder in 1986. I have it on tape and you can have a copy if you like at cost. It's on 2-90 minute cassettes. The sound is adequate, you hear the fire popping. Write me and I'll transcribe any of these.

I tried to catch as much of the song as possible but in an effort to save batteries I waited until someone was singing a song I wanted to tape, so I missed the beginng of most songs. On a few others I only recorded the verses that were new to me. There is plenty of chatter too; that's what you get sitting and drinking around a campfire.

The RealAudio files of almost every song below are found after the name of the person singing the song. All will have a number and .rm in the file title. I have a few links to transcriptions above.

Cassette 1
Big Ship (Frank Plunkett) 01.rm, That's the Way for Me (Diana) 02.rm, A Night in El Paso (Frank), Go Dig My Grave (Mary Fish) 03.rm, I Know that Someday I'll Be Singing Above (Diana) 04.rm, My Wife and the Devil (Mary) 05.rm, My Name is Captain Kidd/As I Sailed (Marty) 06.rm, My Grandfather's Cock (Saralinda) 07.rm, The Instrument (parody of the Cuckoo's Nest/this time a male version.) Saralinda 08.rm, The Bonny Black Hair (pubic hair) Marty 09.rm, Roll Your Leg Over - Saralinda 10.rm, I Have My Price - ? 11.rm, Three Drunken Maidens - Saralinda 12.rm, My Husband Has No Courage in Him - all 13.rm, Never Wed an Old Man, - all 14.rm,  while all the women are pissin & moanin... Plowin the Road - Frank 15.rm, Hoodoo Ball - Jim Blake 16.rm, Three Gypsys - ? (beautiful voice) 17.rm, When I was in My Prime/The Heart of Mine - Diana 18.rm, Padstow may Song - Saralinda 19.rm, Circle of the Sun - all 20.rm, Daddy Take a Nap - (Frank) 21.rm, a Michael Hurley/Holy Modal Rounders song about spaghetti, doing the dishes (Title anyone?) - Marty 22.rm, Why Should We Forsake Good Liquor - all 23.rm, Martin Said To His Man/Who's the Fool Now - all 24.rm, My God How the Money Rolls in - Mary 25.rm, My Bonnie Ewe Tree - Mary 26.rm, Dona - Diana 27.rm, Movin' Day (Jim Kweskin) - Jim Blake 28.rm, Rolling Down to Old Maui - Saralinda 29.rmDown on Old Bum Knee - Lindy 30.rm, Garnett's Homemade Beer - all 31.rm, Reader's Digest Condensed version of Barrett's Privateers - ? 32.rm, excerpts of Steve Goodman's Vegematic song, other, Would You Like to Swing On A Star - all, Old Time Religion- all 33.rm, Marty tells joke.

Cassette 2
Because My Love Loves Me - Diana 34.rmThe Phantom Flasher - Jim (parody of The Keeper), and then the original - Mary 35.rm, Off to the Rodeo (you fuckin jerk, you piss me off) - Mary 36.rm, Cape Cod Girls - Marty 37.rm, Alligator Named Albert - Marty & Saralinda 38.rm, Black Socks (round) - Marty, parody of little bird in modern times = ? (Can anyone tell me more about this, who is singing it? Sorry it's very hard to hear.) 39.rm, the Scotsman - Mary 40.rm, Morris tunes: Lads a Bunchum 41.rm, Bonny Green 42.rm , Marty's version - w/ reptiles43.rm,  Waltzing with Bears - ?, Dance with Me - Saralinda 44.rm, On a Monday Morning - Mary 45.rm, The Logger - Saralinda 46.rm, ditty sample - Mary 47.rm, Johnny Be
Fair - Glenda 48.rm, (Day #2): days of the week song - Roger's English friend 49.rm, Nutting Girl - other lines - sung by ? 50.rm, the Old Dunn Cow - Roger and all,  Pleasant and Delightful/the sharks they played melodeons - Roger? 51.rm, Mama's Little Baby Loves Shortnin Bread - Mary, 5 Constipated Men of the Bible - all (excerpts only) 52.rm, I Love a Moose - Mary 53.rm, the Philosopher's Song - Roger, Lord of the Dance (end), You're drunk (snippet) - Mary, On The Good Ship Venus - Kevin from New Hampshire & Saralinda 54.rm, Why Men Should Grow a Mustache It's the One Thing Girls Can't Do - Jim Blake (see next song), They're Always in the Way- Mary (the last two are both in this file -->) 55.rm
 

1987 12th Night (1/9/87), (tape #5), Daycroft w/ Greenwich Guard, recorder group, Six In Hand, Hillside Morris, Daycroft Chorus. Picture in the Greenwich News of team  in Abbots Bromley kit and antlers and another picture and blurb with just Judith in antlers and kit.

Listen to whole show!

Boar's Head, Nels - song and intro, Nutting Girl - Ducklington (pictures: Eileen, Paul, me and Judith ready to do Nutting Girl?. Paul doing Nutting Girl), Nels - choose King & Queen (hear Carol Mazza), Pomp and Circumstance played on kazoos, King Art and Queen Gretchen (Mark's Gretchen?, thanked for caligraphy), Joy Health Love and Peace, The Shortest Day of the Year - ?, Hillsdale Morris - Ring O Bells, Mummer's Play with Six In Hand (w/ men & Fried, Genny, Jane Bridges?, Fran, Leah, Marie, Anne) w/ dance (Escrick), continued and another sword dance, Good King Wenceslas, Sussex Carol, Deck The Halls, Green Grow The Rushes O (I lead and screw up, very fast), Peace Round, A Soulin - kids, Abbots Bromley on concertina (edited) (listen to), recorders (too hot), some English Country dances played on piano and recorder with percussion, Rev Prynne - Nels, Upton - border morris style (picture: unknown dancers (Peggy? doing a border dance (Upton? with short sticks?) and blackface), Daycroft Chorus - What Child Is This, Figgy Duff, Nels - It's traditional to be unprepared, reading, recorders (sounds like Good Christian Men Rejoice), Greenwich Guard rapper - fast! listen to them!, Nels - Lord of the Dance, (edit) Ed Potter gets set up, Nels and curtain call (w/ cheers for Mianus).



1987 New Haven Ale, 5/23-5/27/87
 
side a (mp3)
Singing by the fire: Martin Said To His Man - Annie Anderson, “round alert” - Roger, contra round! - Annie Anderson, The Mickey Dam, Mr Dunn’s Song, The Philosopher’s Song - Roger and all, Advice To Drunkards (spoken piece) - Stacey Roth, Foolish, Incredibly Foolish - Annie Anderson, Rolling Mills Of NJ (additional verses) - Stacy Roth, Roger, Dido Fido Bonzo - ! excerpt, (Beer) Never Did Poison Me - Stacey Roth, ? - Stacey - What Have I For Mondays - Stacy Roth, Diggers song, (end of campfire singing),

Saturday night sing: Make Lunch For Each Other - long-haired blond & Micheal Bodner?, nice tune w/ gtr & vocal - Whacking Stick?, same as Mary Black?, Bonny Light Horsemen - big guy (dark hair, beard, sings good songs), Millstone River - spoof, Star Trek (edited), Northumbrian (shortbread) small pipes classic tune!, Lady Be Good on trombone& gtr w/ dancing/ Let Union Be - all, Modern Inn Keeper! - Jim Van Fleet (tune - oh don’t you - - me?), Stacey doing a bit of previous Advice To Drunkards
 
side b (mp3)
cont, Old Dunn Cow - Ranger Rick?, Old Rose And Crown (by the Pie ? dunns song guy & all chorus), On A Monday Morning - Mary & ?, Going Down On Old Bum Knee - intro only, Stacey - a wordy nimble song, Old Time Religion verses!, The Girls Are Getting Prettier And Younger Everyday - ?, Nancy Of Yarmouth end, Pleasant & Delightful - Marie! (w/ obscene verses!, "may I have my finger back" - me), The Wall Is High - Stacey! (almost forgets in the middle of one verse and we are all on the edge of our seats), Easy & Free - Ranger Rick - nice harmonies!


1989 Merrie Sex Ale singing
(Good recording, good singing, good songs)

side a,
I walk with the tape recorder towards the dining hall, you hear
my feet on the gravel and the tape recorder brush against my pants, then into the dining hall, Rosebud In June - Diana, Glenda - ? (lots of background noise), Why Should We Forsake Good Liquor - Jim Blake? (very fesity), Down On Old Bum Knee, Success To The Farmer - Bill Fisher?, I'd rather be a woman than a poor hard working man, Saralinda - I Can't Help It If My Heart Is Big Enough For Two, McTavish Is Dead (Ted Kennedy version) - male, Christ You Know It Ain't Easy - Mary Fish, Boozin - Jim, Rum By Gum - Jim, I Want A Beer Just Like Dear Old Dad - Malcolm, Take Me Out To The Ballpark - male, George Washington Bridge (sung to the tune of The Man On The Flying Trapeze), The 20th Century Is Almost Over - Jim and all, Charlie Brown - male, Black Socks, Jim - There's No Way To ? Its Comin Every Day, Diana - pretty/quiet, Take Her In Your Arms - Mary, Jim - I'm Saved, Go Where I Send Thee - male, All God's Critters

side b
Dudley Laufman - English condom joke, When I Play The Fiddle (folks dance like the waves of the sea), fiddle tune, spoken piece on country dancing, Branch Of May, chicken and book and frog joke, Rosin The Beau, Let Your  Back and Sides Go Bare - Saralinda, All Because He Didn't Eat His Vegetables - male (using Rise Up Singing), I Love A Moose - Mary (complete), background noise, ? - male, Down On Old Bum Knee - male, Saralinda? - World's last Whale, Let Union Be - Robert Mills?, Pleasure To Know You - all


1989 5 Day Wonder singing   

(Good recording, good singing, good songs)

female - familiar tradtional (The Blacksmith?), On A Monday Morning (1986 5 Day Wonder version) - Mary Fish?, short - male, Grizelda - male, (Curtis, Connie) - ?, Rolling The Woodpile Down - male (Way Down in Florida), Saralinda - All Of Life Is Like A ? (You'd better rosin up your bow, before its time to go), Rosin The Beau - Tom French, Roll The Old Chariots Along - male, Diana - ?, Diana - ?, Milder & Molder & Festle & Foe - ?, Christine Gaca - The Seven Deadly Sins! (Nancy Winnig cough), Christine Gaca - Bored of the Dance, Falling in Love Is Such A Pain - Connie?, Dance With Me - Saralinda, Haste To The Maypole (w/ accordion!) - Christine/all, Padstow May Song - short, One Ton Of Mayo, John Barleycorn - Christine (Joan Sugerbeet version), Saralinda? - Respect for Paddy Murphy, Did You Ever See..., The Woman of Ipanema (parody of the Girl From Ipanema), Down By The Green Woodside - Tom Gajowkski?, Christine  w/ accordion - ?, Christine - What Do Doggies Do When They Get Boogers, Don't Have Any More Mrs Moore - male.


1989 NoWeare Bienial Odd Year Ale singing   

(Good recording, good singing, good songs)

side a,
fireside, Where I Have Been Many A Time - male (who is this?), NoWeare Ale Song - Sara Jane?, Now I'm A Fucking Hero - Jim Blake, male - Make Your Money When You're Young (You'll Need It When You're Old), Off To The Rodeo - Mary, ..., Glenda - Joy Of My Heart (one verse), female - ?, Glenda - unknown song (Shady Grove?)

side b
You've Got To Make Hey When The Sunshines - female pretty voice (Sara Jane?), Odds of Going To Heaven - Jim Blake, blessing - Jim


1989 Ale singing
From Paul Kerlee's tape. Not sure which ale!

How Can I Keep From Singing - all (hear Paul and I talk about song books), Rosin The Beau, Landlord Fill The Flowing Bowl - unknown woman, Fathom The Bowl - unknown man with deep voice, Let Your Back and Sides Go Bare - Saralinda, I'm My Own Grandpa - unknown woman, When Jone's Ale Was New - unknown men, (speed changes) When Jone's Ale Was New (cont.), (Berryman's) Squalor - unknown man, On Ilkla Moor Baht 'at - all, Dianah - Rose Bud in June.


1994 Ship's Ale singing    

(Bad recording, mediocre singing, mediocre songs)

Note: Most of these songs are hard to hear since the mic didn't pick up very well. I've included everything thogh just in case there is something you might find appealing. I might be able to re-record them/whatever you want via the computer if you want. The last few songs on tape 2, side b sound better... Another problem was that the original tapes used to record this were recycled church organ tapes from Paul and sometimes they didn't get fully erased so you may hear little organ bits inbetweeen songs. Finally, Barbara Ruth, was sitting near me and therfore quite noticeable on "alternate harmony" on many of these...

tape 1 side a,
Strike The Bell - big guy, The Vicar and The Frog - big guy, All For Me Grog, Roll Down, Isle Au Haut, Go To Sea Once More (Curtis on alternate harmony), The Barley Mow, Roll Down To Rio, Runnin' Down To Cuba - Aldoona?, Hard Times (CP Line) - Glenda, The Old Dun Cow, When We Go Rolling Home, Aura Lee - Glenda, Three Legged Man - Jim, Safety Net - Glenda

tape 1 side b

Safety Net cont., Pleasant and Delightful, big guy w/ satire verse, Keep In Mind That I Love You - female, Cutting More Wood - Aldoona?, Star Of The County Down - big guy and wife, Chickens In The Yard - Glenda?, Five Foot Flirt - female, Nutting Girl - Jeff, Pleasant and Delightful - (w/ Roger verse), Glorious Ale - female, Chicken On A Raft - Bob DuPre, Why Paddy's Not At Work Today - Aldoona?, Black Velvet Band - big guy and wife, Me Charmin' Little Russky? - big guy (Russian), Lancet Is The Beer For Me - female (sung to Yankee Doodle), Stars And Stripe Forever - Jim, Dead Egyptian Blues - Glenda, Rosin Up Your Bow - female, White Collar Holler - Jim?         

tape 2 side a,

(It was a bit tricky to read my notes on this so it may not be correct)
Garnett's Homemade Beer, Keep The Home Fires Burning - Aldoona?, Diner song - male, Paddling Out To Rahway, Invitation To The Blues - Glenda, The Times To Come (What Can You Do) - Marnen, female - unknown song, Aldoona - The Great Storm Is Over, unknown song - male, The Grey Funnel Line - female (w/ Grey Flannel verse), Streets of Laredo parody - Barbara Ruth (singing ON KEY!!), unknown song about women's lib! - ?, Let Union Be, Boozin - big guy, Rosie Get Out My Sunday Shoes - Aldoona?, The Child On Her Knee - female, Roll Your Leg Over - Barbara Ruth (many verses),         

tape 2 side b
No Courage In Him - Glenda, Old Bones - Jim, How Do They Do It - Jim, Roger's Rev Prynne monologue on Dancing (hilarious) (hear a version from one of our 12th Nights), Hamlet - Aldoona?, Dinosaur Song - Marnen, A Bottle Of The Best - Aldoona?, Philosopher's Song - Roger and me, Lumberjack Song - me and ..., Charly Mox Beer (tune of Diana) - Aldoona, Diana - Aldoona and me, Are You Shingling The Rum Sellers Roof - female, Father Come Home - Aldoona, Woodchuck - Glenda, If I Could Return - Aldoona, Henry Of Richmond - Jeff, Oh The Hard Times of Old England - Aldoona, Sing... (?) - Glenda, Clementine - Aldoona, ? excerpt - Glenda        

NOTE; The last few songs in bold above sound MUCH better than most of the rest because Aldoona was sitting closer at that point.


Revisions

11/18/11 Changed Lads and Lasses a sheepshearing go to Rosebud In June
10/19/11 added New Haven Ale singing
11/6/10 added Paul's tape from a 1989 Ale. Which Ale? I don't know.
4/15/10 added lyrics to Roast Beef of Old England
11/7/09  I combined all the songs into one list and fixed (hopefully) all the links from song titles to their respective places on this page.
10/24/09 Revised for web
9/20/04 I add alphabetized list of songs from Ales below song lyrics.
8/11/04 I add a whole bunch of songs from various Ales as RealAudio files for the Morris In A Can CD only. Check 'em out.
7/9/02  Padstow May Song update from Steve Griffiths
2/18/02 Save Your Money While You're Young added by Andrew White
1/21/02 Bonny Green updated
12/01 Whole site moved to new location.
7/11/01 Added some info from Neil Jennings to Nutting Girl, Highland Mary, Getting Upstairs and Beaux of London City.
6/28/01 Added Rock Creek's Bonny Green Garters verse
6/27/01 Added 55 RealAudio versions of the songs from the 5 Day Wonder 1986! and added a verse to Hal and Tow
6/15/01 Carl Zwanzig added a verse to the Lollipop Man, a whole new version of a parody of The Keeper, and added a verse to South Australia.
5/1/01 Added RealAudio files of Jim Blake singing the songs he wrote. (31st of April, Another May Day Morning, How do they do it? and Old Bones.)
2/22/01 Added a verse and spiel to Bonny Green
12/21/00 Moved the counter to it's own page, making it easier to update this page.
10/9/00 Added an Old Time religion verse 
5/6/00 Added Lord of the Dance parody
4/22/00 Added Shave the Donkey aka Step and Fetch Her.
2/1/00 Added Trunkles and new verse to Bonny Green.
6/19/99 Added 4 songs by poet/dancer/human being extroidinaire Jim Blake! (see 5/1/01 note above)

This page has been visited by people from among the following places/ISPs: Australia, New Zealand, Netherlands, Canada, Japan, USA Government!, Denmark, Germany, Finland, USA Military!, Ireland, Israel, United Arab Emirates, Brazil, Mexico, Costa Rica, Norway, Belgium, Portugal, Sweden, old style arpanet!, Hungary, South Africa.

Amazing!

(top)